Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I use a dependency resolver interface in common libraries as an abstraction. This keeps me flexible to switching containers. Given the interfaces and the static IoC class below, I need to initialize the IoC with a factory w/o passing the IKernel from the global asax.

See below how I am using the NinjectHttpApplication base to create the Ninject kernel.

Here is the problem; the IKernel property in CtsDependencyFactory is always null.

Does Ninject not inject itself like this? Should I use a different method to pass IKernel to the factory? I couldn't find a static class like ObjectFactory in StructureMap in Ninject to get a reference to resolver.

Any help is appreciated.

public interface IResolveDependency
{
    T Resolve<T>();
    T Resolve<T>(params object[] parameters);
    T Resolve<T>(string name);
    T Resolve<T>(string name, params object[] parameters);
    object Resolve(Type type);
    IEnumerable<T> ResolveAll<T>();
    void Clear();
}

public interface IResolveDependencyFactory
{
    IResolveDependency CreateInstance();
}

public class CtsDependencyResolver : IResolveDependency
{
    private readonly IKernel m_kernel;

    public CtsDependencyResolver(IKernel kernel)
    {
        m_kernel = kernel;
    }

    #region Implementation of IResolveDependency

    // removed for brevity

    #endregion
}

public class CtsDependencyFactory : IResolveDependencyFactory
{
    [Inject]
    public IKernel Kernel { get; set; }

    #region Implementation of IResolveDependencyFactory

    public IResolveDependency CreateInstance()
    {
        return new CtsDependencyResolver(Kernel);
    }

    #endregion
}

public static class IoC
{
public static IResolveDependency DependencyResolver { get; private set; }

public static void InitilizeWith(IResolveDependencyFactory factory)
{
    DependencyResolver = factory.CreateInstance();
}

public static void Register<T>(T instance)
{
    if (DependencyResolver is IRegisterDependency)
        ((IRegisterDependency)DependencyResolver).Register(instance);
    else
        throw new InvalidOperationException("cannot register service");
}

public static T Resolve<T>(string name)
{
    return DependencyResolver.Resolve<T>(name);
}

public static T Resolve<T>(string name, params object[] parameters)
{
    return DependencyResolver.Resolve<T>(name, parameters);
}

public static T Resolve<T>()
{
    return DependencyResolver.Resolve<T>();
}

public static T Resolve<T>(params object[] parameters)
{
    return DependencyResolver.Resolve<T>(parameters);
}

public static object Resolve(Type type)
{
    return DependencyResolver.Resolve(type);
}

public static IEnumerable<T> ResolveAll<T>()
{
    return DependencyResolver.ResolveAll<T>();
}

public static void Clear()
{
    DependencyResolver.Clear();
}
}

public class MvcApplication : NinjectHttpApplication
{
    private IKernel m_kernel;

    // removed stuff 

    protected override void OnApplicationStarted()
    {
        AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();

        RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters);
        RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);

        IoC.InitilizeWith(new CtsDependencyFactory());
    }

    protected override IKernel CreateKernel()
    {
        var modules = new INinjectModule[]
                          {
                              new FormHandlerModule()
                          };

        m_kernel = new StandardKernel(modules);

        return m_kernel;
    }
}

Thanks

share|improve this question
8  
I use a dependency resolver interface in common libraries as an abstraction. This keeps me flexible to switching containers. This seems like a pointless abstraction to make, and so you end up with a bunch of pointless code that has to be designed, written, tested and maintained. That has a cost, including the opportunity cost of not spending times on code with a higher payoff. This is code I would not have written unless I found myself actually changing containers, and I thought it likely that I might change several more times. But then I question why you are changing containers so much. –  Jason Jun 27 '11 at 15:30
    
these two interfaces and IoC are in common libraries and used in various modules. modules are used in various applications which use different containers such as structuremap, autofac or ninject in this case. it is quite useful actually. i hope this make sense. –  sheldon_cooper Jun 27 '11 at 15:38
add comment

1 Answer 1

You're not using NInject (or any DI container for that matter) correctly. What you're doing is using a service locator which appears to be solving your issue of resolving the dependency you need, however it's simply hiding it. If you follow RRR you will let the container deal with the burden of resolving the dependencies your classes require.

Why is using a service locator an anti-pattern?

Lastly, by resolving dependencies manually you're effectively removing all chances of mocking out dependencies. Whether that's a problem for you, who knows. This is solved by using constructor injection.

Regarding your problem with swapping containers. Unless you're using more than one container per problem (which a big no no) then you should only be resolving the very root component of your project and letting the container take over. Once all is said and done your code should have no idea there's a container present.

I suggest reading Dependency Injection in .NET by Mark Seemann.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.