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I read on some post, but cant find it now that in MVC 3 it was not really needed to create a Validator, only the Attribute. Is this true? I do say I find it confusing that the attribute has the IClientValidatable on it. So what does the DataAnnotationsModelValidator class do if the annotation has the client side script name (IClientValidatable), and the ability to validate (ValidationAttribute IsValid)?

It would be really nice if I didnt have to register the Attribute with the Validator in the global. Can this be done? Did I read some bad advise?

EDIT: Interestingly enough I just tested it by excluding the validator, put all the logic in IsValid and it works great. I guess the only thing that might be missing would be the controller context, but I am not sure that is useful in validation. The IsValid has ValidationContext which has ServiceContainer if I needed a service. Any real disadvantage I am not picking up on here?

EDIT 2: I will start with a validator from this example: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/simonince/archive/2010/06/04/conditional-validation-in-mvc.aspx

The Attribute:

public class RequiredIfAttribute : ValidationAttribute, IClientValidatable
{
    private RequiredAttribute innerAttribute = new RequiredAttribute();
    public string DependentProperty { get; set; }
    public object TargetValue { get; set; }

    public RequiredIfAttribute(string dependentProperty, object targetValue)
    {
        this.DependentProperty = dependentProperty;
        this.TargetValue = targetValue;
    }

    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        return innerAttribute.IsValid(value);
    }

    public System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<ModelClientValidationRule> GetClientValidationRules(ModelMetadata metadata, ControllerContext context)
    {
        ModelClientValidationRule modelClientValidationRule = new ModelClientValidationRule()
        {
            ErrorMessage = FormatErrorMessage(metadata.DisplayName),
            ValidationType = "requiredifattribute"
        };
        modelClientValidationRule.ValidationParameters.Add("requiredifattribute", DependentProperty);
        yield return modelClientValidationRule;
    }
}

The Validator:

public class RequiredIfValidator : DataAnnotationsModelValidator<RequiredIfAttribute>
{
    public RequiredIfValidator(ModelMetadata metadata, ControllerContext context, RequiredIfAttribute attribute)
        : base(metadata, context, attribute)
    {
    }

    public override IEnumerable<ModelClientValidationRule> GetClientValidationRules()
    {
        return base.GetClientValidationRules();
    }

    public override IEnumerable<ModelValidationResult> Validate(object container)
    {
        var field = Metadata.ContainerType.GetProperty(Attribute.DependentProperty);
        if (field != null)
        {
            var value = field.GetValue(container, null);
            if ((value == null && Attribute.TargetValue == null) ||
                (value.Equals(Attribute.TargetValue)))
            {
                if (!Attribute.IsValid(Metadata.Model))
                    yield return new ModelValidationResult { Message = ErrorMessage };
            }
        }
    }
}

With the current code above, I need to register in the Global.asax.cs file:

DataAnnotationsModelValidatorProvider.RegisterAdapter(typeof(RequiredIfAttribute), typeof(RequiredIfValidator));

But if I move everything into just the attribute, I dont have to register it:

public class RequiredIfAttribute : ValidationAttribute, IClientValidatable
{
    private RequiredAttribute innerAttribute = new RequiredAttribute();
    public string DependentProperty { get; set; }
    public object TargetValue { get; set; }

    public RequiredIfAttribute(string dependentProperty, object targetValue)
    {
        this.DependentProperty = dependentProperty;
        this.TargetValue = targetValue;
    }

    protected override ValidationResult IsValid(object value, ValidationContext validationContext)
    {
        var field = validationContext.ObjectInstance.GetType().GetProperty(DependentProperty);
        if (field != null)
        {
            var dependentValue = field.GetValue(validationContext.ObjectInstance, null);
            if ((dependentValue == null && TargetValue == null) ||
                (dependentValue.Equals(TargetValue)))
            {
                if (!innerAttribute.IsValid(value))
                    return new ValidationResult(ErrorMessage);
            }
        }
        return ValidationResult.Success;
    }

    public System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<ModelClientValidationRule> GetClientValidationRules(ModelMetadata metadata, ControllerContext context)
    {
        ModelClientValidationRule modelClientValidationRule = new ModelClientValidationRule()
        {
            ErrorMessage = FormatErrorMessage(metadata.DisplayName),
            ValidationType = "requiredifattribute"
        };
        modelClientValidationRule.ValidationParameters.Add("requiredifattribute", DependentProperty);
        yield return modelClientValidationRule;
    }
}

Is there an problem with the last bit of code replacing all of the other code? Why would I keep the validator class?

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Where did you read this advice? –  Darin Dimitrov Jun 27 '11 at 15:57
    
I wish I could find it, but I cant. It was more of a comment on someones post. What do you think about it? –  CrazyDart Jun 27 '11 at 16:32
    
at the moment I don't think anything as I am still trying to understand what the problem/question is. I was just hoping to see some more context, particular code examples, etc..., that's why I asked for the source in order to try to see more context as you haven't provided enough in your question. Hopefully you will provide some specific code example illustrating the problem you are encountering. –  Darin Dimitrov Jun 27 '11 at 16:41
    
Sure, I will put some code in right now. –  CrazyDart Jun 27 '11 at 16:48
    
Now I am an idiot, but could somebody please explain the above code... Particularly the second part. I know that he is writing an attribute here... A required If Attribute no less, but how does it work? –  DmainEvent Oct 15 '12 at 13:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

CrazyDart,

The IClientValidatable interface was added in MVC3.

Your second example shows a valid use of this new interface. You are correct that it does not have to be registered, and it will provide the necessary client side rules for validation, as well as doing the necessary server side validation.

Go ahead, enjoy it.

counsellorben

share|improve this answer
1  
Well it turns out you are correct. I will use IClientValidatable, and I will look good while doing it. ;-) –  CrazyDart Jun 27 '11 at 19:26
1  
I think IClientValidatable still requires one to add client side script for jquery validation adaptor and validation methods as per my understanding of IClientValidatable. –  afr0 Mar 10 '13 at 14:43

When I use the last option from CrazyDart the server-side part works great in MVC4.

Except I cannot get the client-side validation to work. It never checks for a required field on the client side (although there are some tags added).

I've also checked the 2nd blog post (1st is inspiration of the poster) of Simon Ince about this: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/simonince/archive/2011/02/04/conditional-validation-in-asp-net-mvc-3.aspx

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