Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have multiple implementations of a data source interface. It has one method CanGet used to discover if it can source a particular type and then another Get used to execute it. I am trying to code this specific implementation as such but it does like passing GetCostLedger back from the FindSource because the types do no not match. I can not see how to get this to work. Thanks for any help.

private Func<IEnumerable<T>> FindSource<T>() where T : class
{
    if (typeof(CostLedger).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(T)))
        return GetCostLedger;

    if (typeof(EquipmentInventory).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(T)))
        return GetEquipmentInventory;

    if (typeof(ActivePavingJobs).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(T)))
        return GetActivePavingJobs;

    return null;
}

public IEnumerable<T> GetData<T>() where T : class
{
    var source = FindSource<T>();
    if (source != null)
        return source.Invoke();

    throw new NotImplementedException();
}

public bool CanGet<T>() where T : class
{
    return FindSource<T>() != null;
}

private IEnumerable<CostLedger> GetCostLedger()
{
    //Implementation clipped
}

private IEnumerable<EquipmentInventory> GetEquipmentInventory()
{
    //Implementation clipped
}

private IEnumerable<ActivePavingJobs> GetActivePavingJobs()
{
    //Implementation clipped
}

The use case for this code is in an ETL process that runs a lot of transformations The data sources are called from a factory with the implementations injected like so

_destination.SaveData(
    _mapper.Find<IEnumerable<CostLedger>, LaborAndEquipmentAnalysis>()
               .Process(_source.First(x => x.CanGet<CostLedger>())
    .GetData<CostLedger>(), dashboardName, DateTime.UtcNow));
share|improve this question
    
Clarified my examples to help with confusion on why I am doing what I am doing. –  Brian Wigfield Jun 27 '11 at 17:07

2 Answers 2

up vote -1 down vote accepted

This is most certainly not the way to do it, but if you must....

private Func<IEnumerable<T>> FindSource<T>() where T : class
{
    if (typeof(CostLedger).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(T)))
        return ()=>GetCostLedger ().Cast<T> ();

    return null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@downvoter... reading between the lines, it looks like this is actually a protected override of a generic base class method. If you don't like the answer, at least explain why. –  agent-j Jun 27 '11 at 16:31

Why are you using an open generic type in this method

private Func<IEnumerable<T>> FindSource<T>() where T : class {
    if (typeof(CostLedger).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(T)))
        return GetCostLedger;

    return null;
}

if you are returning a closed generic type?

That is, why are you letting this method work for all T where T is a reference type if you are actually using it when T is CostLedger?

At a minimum, if all you ever want is CostLedger and its derived types, you should say

private Func<IEnumerable<T>> FindSource<T>() where T : CostLedger

But really, I don't see why you don't just say

private Func<IEnumerable<CostLedger>> FindSource()

if all you are using for T is CostLedger.

share|improve this answer
    
CostLedger is my example but its not the only one I return, I have multiple implementations of the data source interface and each can fulfill only certain types. It is up to each implementation to say which they can handle. –  Brian Wigfield Jun 27 '11 at 16:21
    
Your method body says CostLedger is the only type you are using. –  Jason Jun 27 '11 at 16:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.