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Let's assume that we have int x = 371, that is in binary format 101110011. I want to find the index of the left-most unset bit (in this case 7), and the index of the right-most unset bit (in this case 2). What is the most efficient way of doing it?

Here's what I have:

public class BitOperatons {

    public static int setBit(int x, int i) {
        int y = x | (1 << i);
        return y;
    }

    public static boolean isBitSet(int x, int i) {
        int y = setBit(0, i);
        return y == (x & y);
    }    

    public static int findLeftMostSetBit(int x) {
        for (int i = 31; i >= 0; i--) {
            if (isBitSet(x, i))
                return i;
        }
        return -1;
    }

    public static int findRightMostUnsetBit(int x) {
        for (int i = 0; i <= 31; i++) {
            if (! isBitSet(x, i))
                return i;
        }
        return -1;
    }

    public static int findLeftMostUnsetBit(int x) {
        int k = findLeftMostSetBit(x);
        for (int i = k; i >= 0; i--) {
            if (! isBitSet(x, i))
                return i;
        }
        return -1;
    }

    public static1+ void main(String[] args) {
        int x = 
            (1 << 0) |
            (1 << 1) |
            (1 << 4) |
            (1 << 5) |
            (1 << 6) |
            (1 << 8);
        System.out.println(findLeftMostUnsetBit(x));
        System.out.println(findRightMostUnsetBit(x));
    }

}

If I'm not wrong, my current implementation takes linear time. Can we do better?

share|improve this question
    
It's not possible to do better than linear. –  toto2 Jun 27 '11 at 16:24
    
@toto, this is not true, doh forgot, look at Hacker's Delight 5-3 (for example) (leading zeros, which is part of Integer.class) –  bestsss Jun 27 '11 at 16:43
    
@bestsss, OK if you mean machine instructions as suggested by flolo. If you know of a sub-linear algo, I'd like to know. –  toto2 Jun 27 '11 at 16:48
    
@toto, no it's not assembler or CPU provided instruction. it is binary search instead of linear :). Seriously try to find a copy of Hacker's Delight (book) and check it. I will post how to do leading zeros part. I'm sure even SO will have some stuff on. –  bestsss Jun 27 '11 at 16:56
    
@bestsss Yes, I was thinking about it right now. I wanted to write it as an answer. Thanks. Still better to use the Java API. (Edit: just checked the code of Integer.numberOfTrailingZeros and it is binary search.) –  toto2 Jun 27 '11 at 17:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are methods available in the Integer class.

Integer.numberOfTrailingZeros(Integer.lowestOneBit(~yourValue)) would do it for the lowest one unset bit, for the highest it is a bit trickier as we first have to determine the highest set bit.

int leadingZeroBits = Integer.numberOfLeadingZeros(Integer.highestOneBit(yourValue));
result = Integer.
       numberOfTrailingZeros(Integer.highestOneBit((~yourValue)<<leadingZeroBits)
      -leadingZeroBits;`

Should do it for the highest unset bit.

And this may be faster than linear time as processors often have machine instructions to determine fast the leading/trailing zero bit (but not sure if the vm utilize them EDIT: I am now sure ;-).

EDIT: It seems they added the use of asm intrinsics for leading/trailing zeros in 1.6.0_18, ID 6823354

share|improve this answer
    
hmm, indeed intrinsics look like a CPU instruction where possible. –  bestsss Jun 27 '11 at 17:31
    
JFFO! –  Ed Staub Jul 9 '11 at 2:03

Below it's the source code of Integer.numberOfLeadingZeros. As pointed it's taken from HD (Hacker's Delight by Henry S. Warren, Jr)

The main idea is using binary search instead of iterating the bits, one by one. Please, check the book if you are interested in bit twiddling. It's a wonderful piece of art.

public static int numberOfLeadingZeros(int i) {
    // HD, Figure 5-6
    if (i == 0)
        return 32;
    int n = 1;
    if (i >>> 16 == 0) { n += 16; i <<= 16; }
    if (i >>> 24 == 0) { n +=  8; i <<=  8; }
    if (i >>> 28 == 0) { n +=  4; i <<=  4; }
    if (i >>> 30 == 0) { n +=  2; i <<=  2; }
    n -= i >>> 31;
    return n;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The implemented code in the Sun (Oracle) library is slightly different, but equivalent. –  toto2 Jun 27 '11 at 17:10
    
that's from java6 sources. –  bestsss Jun 27 '11 at 17:14
    
I have java7 here. Not sure why they rewrote that... –  toto2 Jun 27 '11 at 17:16
    
@bestsss: numberOfLeadingZeros is a more efficient implementation of my findLeftMostSetBit. However, I don't see how to use it for answering my question, that is finding the index of the left/right-most unset bit. If we have 0000000000000000000000101110011, then I want to find the index of the left-most unset bit, which is 7, and the index of the right-most unset bit, which is 2. How would you do that? (thank you for recommending Hacker's Delight by Henry S. Warren, Jr: it seems a very interesting book, and I'll put it in my wish list :) ) –  MarcoS Jun 28 '11 at 6:49
    
@MarcoS, look at flolo's answer for some insight, this answer was targeting toto's remark in the comments, mostly. Paul Cager's comment also contains a very useful collection of C (can be ported to java too) bit twiddling hacks. –  bestsss Jun 28 '11 at 6:56

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