Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to solve this one..and my code is as follows

#include<stdio.h>
int main() {
    int a, b = 0xaaaaaaaa, c = 0x55555555;
    printf("\n enter the number: \n");
    scanf("%d", & a);
    a = ((a & b) >> 1) | ((a & c) << 1);
    printf("\n %d", a);
}

..but i am getting some weird outputs..can anyone tell me what errors i m making?

share|improve this question
5  
Define "weird outputs". –  Gabe Jun 27 '11 at 16:24
    
whatever number i am entering i am getting one –  learning_bee Jun 27 '11 at 16:30
    
well i changed + to || –  learning_bee Jun 27 '11 at 16:30
    
@learning_bee: That's not the behaviour I get when I run your code. (See e.g. ideone.com/BbJRh.) –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 27 '11 at 16:32
1  
@learning_bee: If you are going to change the + change it to | not ||. But + works in this special case due to the data patterns. –  grok12 Jun 27 '11 at 16:57

3 Answers 3

on my pc this code worked perfectly just changed the plus to |

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int a, b = 0xaaaaaaaa, c = 0x55555555;
    printf("\n enter the number: \n");
    scanf("%d", & a);
    a = ((a & b) >> 1) | ((a & c) << 1);
    printf("\n %d\n", a);
}

OUTPUT:

 enter the number: 
2
 1    
 enter the number: 
1
 2
share|improve this answer
    
ok..thanks..may be there s some problem with my eclpise :( –  learning_bee Jun 27 '11 at 22:06
import java.io.*;
public class EvenOdd {

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        int b = 0xaaaaaaaa, c = 0x55555555;
        System.out.println("enter number:");
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
        String n="";
        try {
            n = br.readLine();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        int num = Integer.parseInt(n);
        num = ((num&b)>>1)|((num&c)<<1);
        System.out.println(num);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
4  
OP asked for a C solution … –  Kay Jul 16 '12 at 18:43

Your idea is ok. Perhaps you're getting the weird outputs because the bitshift don't work exactly as you may expect.

Your variables are of type int. Means - they are signed. Now, when you do the bitshift to a signed integer, there are additional rules about how the MSB bit is propagated. In simple words, when a signed integer is shifted right, the MSB isn't necessarily zero, it's copied from the old MSB value.

Try to replace int by unsigned int.

share|improve this answer
    
#include<stdio.h> int main() { unsigned int a; int b=0xaaaaaaaa,c=0x55555555; printf("\n enter the number: \n"); scanf("%d",&a); a=((a&b)>>1)||((a&c)<<1); printf("\n %d",a); } –  learning_bee Jun 27 '11 at 16:56
    
this is i am trying now.. –  learning_bee Jun 27 '11 at 16:56
    
but whatever i give i get 1 –  learning_bee Jun 27 '11 at 16:59
    
are << and >> arithmetic shift by standard? I think logical shift is more useful –  ShinTakezou Jun 27 '11 at 17:04
4  
For signed integers, << has undefined behavior on negative values or if a positive value overflows, and >> has implementation-defined behavior on negative values. Do not use bitshifts with signed types. Do as valdo said and change your type to unsigned and your code will work fine. –  R.. Jun 27 '11 at 17:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.