Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my program I have a base Object class and a vector. I have an operation that I want to perform on each Object*, however the operation is dependent on the Object*'s most derived class. Therefore, I use the visitor pattern. However, I've found that the visitor pattern leads to a high amount of coupling; whenever I add a new Object derived class, I must change the base Visitor and every class that derives from Visitor.

Is there an easier way to perform an operation on a list of objects based on their run time type that does not lead to such high coupling?

share|improve this question
    
How about a virtual function? –  Kerrek SB Jun 27 '11 at 17:22
    
Could you give more details and/or examples of what you want to do with the objects? –  antonm Jun 27 '11 at 17:26
    
I didn't specify that the set of operations on derived classes should be able to change at run time. Visitor encapsulates the set of operations into one class which can be subclassed and switched out at run time. –  Phineas Jun 27 '11 at 17:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm going to read between the lines and guess that your most derived objects have member functions that are unique to them and don't exist in any of the other derived objects, which is why you don't want to add them to the base class.

You can use dynamic_cast to see if a pointer belongs to the most derived class, then call the function if it does.

MyBase * pBase = *iterator;
MyDerived * pDerived = dynamic_cast<MyDerived *>(pBase);
if (pDerived != NULL)
    pDerived->UniqueMethod();
share|improve this answer
class Object
{
  virtual void action() = 0;
  /* ... */
};

void objectAction(Object * o) { o->action(); }

int main()
{
  std::vector<Object*> v;
  std::for_each(v.begin(), v.end(), objectAction);
}

Now just implement action in each derived class.

share|improve this answer

any virtual function will do...

Object* obj;
//...
obj->doOperation();
share|improve this answer

Your abstract base class (call it 'object') provides the abstract implementation framework that each inherited class must implement. You just invoke the proper methods on each instance of the base class. Something like this (in C#, because my C++ is rather corroded, but you should get the idea):

public abstract class Widget
{
  public void MandatoryMethod() ; // no method implementation
}

public class FooConcreteWidget : Widget
{
  public override void MandatoryMethod()
  {
    // some concreted implementation
  }
}
public class BarConcreteWidget : Widget
{
  public override void MandatoryMethod()
  {
    // another concrete implementation
  }
}

...
List<Widget> Widgets = GetSomeWidgets() ;

for ( Widget widget in Widgets )
{
   widget.MandatoryMethod() ;
}

That's about all there is to it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.