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In Lua, assigning a table with a specified key might go like this:

a = { x = 4 }

...or perhaps like...

a = { ['x'] = 4 }

Easy enough. However, if I introduce periods into the key (as in a domain name) nothing seems to work. All of the following fail:

a = { "a.b.c" = 4 }
a = { a.b.c = 4 }
a = { ['a.b.c'] = 4 }
a = { ["a.b.c"] = 4 }
a = { [a.b.c] = 4 }

All of these return the same error:

$ ./script.lua
/usr/bin/lua: ./script.lua:49: `}' expected near `='

What am I missing here? Several of the examples seem quite straight-forward and should work (while others have apparent problems).

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At least two of your examples should work in Lua. ({ ['a.b.c'] = 4 } and { ["a.b.c"] = 4 } ). – kikito Jun 27 '11 at 18:36
up vote 3 down vote accepted

In lua table element may be either a Name or an Expression. Citing language reference, "Names (also called identifiers) in Lua can be any string of letters, digits, and underscores, not beginning with a digit.", and everything else is interpreted as an identifier in this context. Therefore, a.b.c as a table index is treated as expression, which is evaluated to get the actual table index. This would work, but would be useless:

a = { b = { c = 1 } }
x = {}
x['a.b.c'] = 7

print(x['a.b.c'])

Also note, that foo.a.b.c is equal to foo['a']['b']['c'] and not to foo['a.b.c'].

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Another poster hit the problem on the head - "Is something else wrong with your script?" - but this is the most complete answer. Somehow, in getting an example put together like above, something broke. The answers hinge on the fact that ["a.b.c.d"] and ['a.b.c.d'] were string literals as table keys, and [a.b.c.d] is the value a.b.c.d as a table key. – Mei Jun 27 '11 at 19:34
a = { ['a.b.c'] = 4 }
a = { ["a.b.c"] = 4 }

These two are all valid.

a = { [a.b.c] = 4 }

This could be valid, depending on the exact identifiers used. For example

b = { c = { d = "Ohai!" } } }
a = { [b.c.d] = 4 }

would be valid.

If your interpreter is telling you they are not valid, then you've either done something else wrong, or there's a bug in the interpreter. The others however would not be valid.

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Is there something else wrong in your script?

$ ./lua
Lua 5.1.4  Copyright (C) 1994-2008 Lua.org, PUC-Rio
> a = { ["a.b.c"] = 4 }
> print (a["a.b.c"])
4
> print (a.a)
nil
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