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I have a table PEOPLE, with columns 'firstName' 'lastName' (varchars) and 'deleted' (bit) amongst others.

I want to delete from this table, entries that have the property TRUE for deleted, but only if they share their exact firstName and lastName with another, separate, entry in the table.

In other words, remove from the table 'deleted' people, but only if they are a duplicate.

Not sure how to do this, and especially not how to do it quickly. Any help is appreciated, thanks.

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How can you tell which is duplicate and which is primary record? –  AJ. Jun 27 '11 at 17:32
    
possible duplicate of Duplicate Entries in DB –  Neal Jun 27 '11 at 17:34
    
All fields are in the same table? –  Antonio Laguna Jun 27 '11 at 17:34
    
@Antonio: All fields are in the same table –  Yottagray Jun 27 '11 at 17:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
DELETE FROM people
WHERE EXISTS (
    SELECT *
    FROM people p2
    WHERE people.firstName = p2.firstName AND people.lastName = p2.lastName
    GROUP BY firstName, lastName
    HAVING COUNT(*)>1
)
AND deleted = 1 -- True
share|improve this answer
    
do you need the where clause in the nested statement? –  Dirk Jun 27 '11 at 17:41
    
Yes, to join the subquery with the outer table. –  niktrs Jun 27 '11 at 17:43
    
@niktrs, this will take a loooong time is the table is huge. –  Neal Jun 27 '11 at 17:47
    
won't this query delete all entries that have deleted = 1? –  Abhay Jun 27 '11 at 17:49
    
We are asked "I want to delete from this table, entries that have the property TRUE for deleted, but only if they share their exact firstName and lastName with another", so we want deleted=1 and every lastName, firstName count > 1 –  niktrs Jun 27 '11 at 17:53

If your table has a unique primary key (... will depend on design...), then this is a viable alternative to needing to count the occurrances of entries:

DELETE FROM people as A
WHERE deleted = 1
AND EXISTS (SELECT '1'
            FROM people as B
            WHERE B.id <> A.id
            AND A.firstName = B.firstName
            AND A.lastName = B.lastName)

This may have slightly better performance than counting rows. Please note that this query will likely suffer the same possible issue present in the previous answer; specifically, if there are two or more 'deleted' rows, and no 'non-deleted', both of them will probably be removed (leaving you with no rows!). If the intent of the query is only to remove 'deleted' rows when there is a 'non-deleted' equivalent row, add AND B.deleted = 0 as part of the inner WHERE clause.

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Great -- this one allows an easy AND B.deleted = 0 fix that I suspect the questioner wants, where the other doesn't. –  Chris Cunningham Jun 27 '11 at 21:23
    
Suggestion: Use A.id>B.id, so everything newer than the first record will be deleted. Also performs faster. –  niktrs Jun 28 '11 at 3:43
    
@niktrs - Unfortunately, that presumes that only later (or earlier) ids are ever 'deleted'. Depending on design and use, this assumption may or may not be valid. But yes, otherwise, that would likely perform better. –  Clockwork-Muse Jun 28 '11 at 15:35

Here is a rudimentary way of doing it:

http://www.justin-cook.com/wp/2006/12/12/remove-duplicate-entries-rows-a-mysql-database-table/

Basically:
1. Create a new table with GROUP BY.
2. Delete old table.
3. Rename new table.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. A very good alternative –  niktrs Jun 28 '11 at 4:44

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