Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am fairly new to P/Invoke (and very rusty on C) and I have spent considerable time trying solve the folling problem:

I want to call a unmanaged C function from managed C#. The C function should create an array with values and return this so I can use these values in C#. (The opposite works fine, i.e. passing in an array from C# to C.) I.e. I want to do pass parameters as references with arrays. Here's a simple sample code of what I figure should work (but does not):

C:

int __declspec(dllexport) __stdcall AllocateMemory(int **values, const unsigned int N)
{
  int sum = 0;
  free(*values);
  *values = (int*) malloc(N*sizeof(int));
  for(unsigned int i = 0; i < N; i++)  { 
  (*values)[i] = i;    
  sum += (*values)[i];
}

This works fine from a C console test app directly:

int main( int argc, char** argv) 
{
  int* values;
  int sum = AllocateMemory(&values, 4);
  printf ("Sum: %d\n", sum);

}

However, making this call directly from C# renders a (memory) System.AccessVioaltionException:

[DllImport("Test.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Ansi, SetLastError = true, CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Winapi)]
public static extern int AllocateMemory([Out, MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPArray, SizeConst = 10)] out int[] someValues, int N);

private static void RunCalculation(string message)
{
  int[] someValues; 
  int sum = AllocateMemory(out someValues, 4);
}

I've tried various versions of the DllImport signature without success and I'll continue my investigation now. However, if anyone has a hint I would be much obliged!


(Below is added an hour or so later (after some comments below) since I am not allowed to post a reply myself until tomorrow)

I found I was able to use the following C# code:

[DllImport("FrontAuction2.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Ansi, SetLastError = true, CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Winapi)]
public static extern float AllocateCudaMemory(out IntPtr someValues, int N);

private static IntPtr AllocateCudaMemory()
{ 
  IntPtr temp; 
  float sum = AllocateCudaMemory(out temp, 4);  

  //NOTE: If you'd actually want to get the value and just not want to pass the IntPtr to another P/Invoke method (as I do), this is one way: 
  //var values = new int[4];
  //Marshal.Copy(temp, values, 0, 4);

  return temp;
} 

However, there are some interesting points in the comments below which I have commented on.

The purpose of all this on my account is to allow a CUDA GPU memory reference to be passed to C# for later usage. I think a better way to do this probably is to keep the reference in a COM C++ state server instead of passing it to C#. But solving this will at least make it possible for me to focus on GPU stuff right now instead of interop.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's best, if you can do so, to allocate the memory in C# and let your C code fill out the array:

C

__declspec(dllexport) void __stdcall PopulateArray(int N, int values[])
{
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < N; i++)
        values[i] = i;    
}

C#

[DllImport(@"test.dll")]
public static extern void PopulateArray(int N, int[] values);

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int N = 5;
    int[] values = new int[N];
    PopulateArray(N, values);
}

It seems that your question missed the crucial information that you need to allocate the memory in your C code and then hold the pointer in your C# code so that in turn you can hand it on to CUDA.

Do it like this:

C

__declspec(dllexport) int* __stdcall AllocateIntArray(int N)
{
    int i;
    int *values = malloc(N*sizeof(int));
    for (i = 0; i < N; i++)
        values[i] = i;    
    return values;
}

__declspec(dllexport) void __stdcall FreeMemory(void* ptr)
{
    free(ptr);
}

C#

[DllImport(@"test.dll")]
public static extern IntPtr AllocateIntArray(int N);

[DllImport(@"test.dll")]
public static extern void FreeMemory(IntPtr ptr);

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    IntPtr ptr = AllocateIntArray(5);
    //...do something with the memory
    FreeMemory(ptr);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, Thanks David for your answer. You are right, this is a better version, although I probably will have to use parameters in the future. I'm sorry that I was not accurate enough in the info. I found an answer to my problem, but since I wasn't able to post it I can not share it until tomorrow. Bides, you were so fast answering that I didn't have a chance anyways.. :) –  Toby999 Jun 27 '11 at 20:06
    
I found I could update my original post though with my solution. Funny. Why is that allowed when you are not allowed to post comments on your own post? I'm a newbiw here as you can tell. :) –  Toby999 Jun 27 '11 at 20:20
add comment

Your C code has a memory leak, the memory for the array isn't getting released. The pinvoke marshaller does not like leaking memory. It is going to try to release the array, it will use CoTaskMemFree(). That's not going to come to a good end, you didn't allocate with CoTaskMemAlloc().

Don't write code that requires the caller to release memory allocated by the callee. That very rarely works out well. Simply let the caller pass an array that you fill:

int __declspec(dllexport) __stdcall AllocateMemory(int *values, const unsigned int N)
{
  int sum = 0;
  for(unsigned int i = 0; i < N; i++)  { 
    values[i] = i;    
    sum += values[i];
  }
}

[DllImport("Test.dll")]
public static extern int AllocateMemory(int[] someValues, int N);
...
  int[] values = new int[10];
  int sum = AllocateMemory(values, values.Length);

You'll have to come up with a different name for that function :)

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, I was aware of that and omitted to free it up in order to keep focus on the main problem. But I had no idea that it could have such a consequence. –  Toby999 Jun 27 '11 at 20:22
    
And Ouch! I did not know this about P/Invoke and CoTaskMemFree(). I added some extra info at the end of the question to explain why I am doing this. With your answer in mind, I think I definitly have to revert back to a COM C++ state server instead of using P/Invoke then. Thanks for sharing! And yes: better names will be there. :) –  Toby999 Jun 27 '11 at 20:31
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.