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Sorry for the confusing title of the question. I am uncertain about how should I implement ViewModels and Models which derive from a base class.

My ViewModel classes are based on a ViewModelBase, the ViewModelBase holds a ModelBase which serves as a base class for all other models.

Each ViewModel holds a "Model" Property, however, because a Model property was defined by the base ViewModel class as the ModelBase class, I always have to create another property which casts the Model - from ModelBase to the relevant Model class.

My question is - is there not a simpler solution? Is there a design pattern which is relevant for these issues?

Here's a code sample:

public abstract class BasicViewModel : ViewModelBase
{
    public BasicViewModel()
    {
    }
    public ModelBase Model { get; set; }
}

public class ModelBase
{
}

public class ContainableViewModel : BasicViewModel
{
    public ContainableViewModel(ContainableModel model)
    {
        this.Model = model;
    }

    public ContainableModel MyModel { get { return (ContainableModel)Model; } }

    public int Children { get { return MyModel.Children; } set { MyModel.Children = value; } }
}

public class ContainableModel : ModelBase
{
    public ContainableModel()
    {
        Children = 2;
    }

    public int Children { get; set; }
}

As you can see, the "MyModel" property is the one which bugs me.

Thank you very much for your help and time!

share|improve this question
    
ColinE's answer is only good if you do not want to use any type of base collections for your objects. If you want to use collections, your original code seems to be the most appropriate answer. –  Matt Way Nov 30 '11 at 3:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If each of your view model contains a Model property, you could use generics:

public abstract class BasicViewModel<TModelType> : ViewModelBase
    where TModelType : ModelBase
{
    public BasicViewModel(TModelType model)
    {
        Model = model;
    }

    public TModelType Model { get; set; }
}

public class ModelBase
{
}

Your containable view model is now defined as follows:

public class ContainableViewModel : BasicViewModel<ContainableModel>
{
    public ContainableViewModel(ContainableModel model)
        : base(model)
    {
    }

    // you can now omit this method, it is defined on the abstract superclass
    //public ContainableModel Model { get { return ()Model; } }

    public int Children { get { return MyModel.Children; } set { MyModel.Children = value; } }
}

public class ContainableModel : ModelBase
{
    public ContainableModel()
    {
        Children = 2;
    }

    public int Children { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
hey, thanks alot! this was my other solution - which turned out to be much dirtier when working with more complicated classes. thank you –  seren1ty Jun 27 '11 at 20:27

I generally don't use a base class for the different Model types, as there is generally not a one to one correspondance between ViewModel and Model objects. Further, the Model objects generally don't have much in common. This is different from the ViewModel objects, which all tie in via data binding and therefore could benefit from various helper methods that standardize the way you bind to your ViewModel instances.

The 'Model' in Model-View-ViewModel is a layer which provides your business logic and data interaction (everything not related to visualization and interaction with the user.) Your CustomerViewModel for your CustomerWindow might make use of a Customer object from your Model layer, but it very likely has references to other objects from your model, like some sort of Repository. Other Views, like say your MainWindow, might have a MainViewModel that doesn't directly correspond to any Model object, but probably has at least a few dependencies on your Model.

share|improve this answer
    
we could argue around that but some a lot abstract models can be seen as a List, a SortedList, Queue, Tree etc. which have some things in common. Maybe that level of abstraction is too much, but nevertheless using a base model can be doable. I'd argue that business logic could be it's separate place, the domain, where repository actions work on those models. Which are not more than data stores. –  Marino Šimić Jun 27 '11 at 20:34

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