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Does anyone know which is more efficient/faster. What would be a good way to test this myself, I don't have large XML documents (<500 KB, not sure if that is large or small) but I have to write these statements over and over again in the code, so wondering which is better/optimal.

XDocument doc = XDocument.Load(file);

doc.Root.Element("childNode").Value;

or

doc.Element("rootNode").Element("childNode").Value ;

Another one:

doc.Root.Elements("childNodes");

vs.

doc.Element("rootNode).Elements("childNodes");

vs.

doc.Element("rootNode").Descendants("childNodes"); 

vs.

doc.Root.Descendants("childNodes") ;

When comparing:

doc.XPathSelectElement("/xpath").Value

is it any faster than the DOM method i.e

XMLDocument dom = new XMLDocument();
dom.LoadXml(input);
dom.SelectSingleNode("/xpath").Value 
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2  
Have you tried benchmarking them? –  Russ Cam Jun 27 '11 at 20:17
    
It is highly unlikely that anyone will already know this answer. Just test it your self! Also Descendants vs. Elements performance is highly dependant on the structure of the XML document –  ColinE Jun 27 '11 at 20:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can profile this yourself using the Stopwatch class, or if it's really important, look into tools such as Ants Profiler which will give you some proper metrics.

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Been a while since I checked this, anyway for future reference, and to help anyone else - Using XMLDocument instead of XDocument is significantly slower. Also, using XElement where applicable, instead of having to create XDocument is more efficient. The efficiency of above queries are very similar, with slight variation in the XML structure. I didn't get a chance to test against significantly large XML. –  Amy Dec 9 '11 at 23:15

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