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After much looking, I found a bit of code that converts a BufferedImage to a SWT Image (don't bother reading it yet):

public static ImageData convertToSWT(BufferedImage bufferedImage) {
    if (bufferedImage.getColorModel() instanceof DirectColorModel) {
        DirectColorModel colorModel = (DirectColorModel) bufferedImage.getColorModel();
        PaletteData palette = new PaletteData(
            colorModel.getRedMask(),
            colorModel.getGreenMask(),
            colorModel.getBlueMask()
        );
        ImageData data = new ImageData(
            bufferedImage.getWidth(),
            bufferedImage.getHeight(), colorModel.getPixelSize(),
            palette
        );
        WritableRaster raster = bufferedImage.getRaster();
        int[] pixelArray = new int[3];
        for (int y = 0; y < data.height; y++) {
            for (int x = 0; x < data.width; x++) {
                raster.getPixel(x, y, pixelArray);
                int pixel = palette.getPixel(
                    new RGB(pixelArray[0], pixelArray[1], pixelArray[2])
                );
                data.setPixel(x, y, pixel);
            }
        }
        return data;
    } else if (bufferedImage.getColorModel() instanceof IndexColorModel) {
        IndexColorModel colorModel = (IndexColorModel) bufferedImage.getColorModel();
        int size = colorModel.getMapSize();
        byte[] reds = new byte[size];
        byte[] greens = new byte[size];
        byte[] blues = new byte[size];
        colorModel.getReds(reds);
        colorModel.getGreens(greens);
        colorModel.getBlues(blues);
        RGB[] rgbs = new RGB[size];
        for (int i = 0; i < rgbs.length; i++) {
            rgbs[i] = new RGB(reds[i] & 0xFF, greens[i] & 0xFF, blues[i] & 0xFF);
        }
        PaletteData palette = new PaletteData(rgbs);
        ImageData data = new ImageData(
            bufferedImage.getWidth(),
            bufferedImage.getHeight(),
            colorModel.getPixelSize(),
            palette
        );
        data.transparentPixel = colorModel.getTransparentPixel();
        WritableRaster raster = bufferedImage.getRaster();
        int[] pixelArray = new int[1];
        for (int y = 0; y < data.height; y++) {
            for (int x = 0; x < data.width; x++) {
                raster.getPixel(x, y, pixelArray);
                data.setPixel(x, y, pixelArray[0]);
            }
        }
        return data;
    }
    return null;
}

(found here: http://www.java2s.com/Code/Java/SWT-JFace-Eclipse/ConvertsabufferedimagetoSWTImageData.htm).

I've tested it, and it works just fine. The problem is that I don't understand it (my best guess is that it uses the raw data interfaces of both to make the transfer). It occurred to me that a much simpler solution would be to write the BufferedImage out to ByteArrayOutputStream, and then read it back into a SWT Image withByteArrayInputStream. Are there any problems with this solution? What about speed?

This conversion is necessary because all of the image resizing libraries out there are for AWT, and yet I'm displaying the image with SWT.

Thanks!

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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The complexity of the code is mainly due to the two possible color models of BufferedImage. I don't think you can improve much on this. First of all, the use of an intermediate Stream will require the two image systems have a common format, and the conversion to/from a Stream is definitely going to be way slower that the current code.

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Thanks, that answers my question perfectly. –  Jonah Jun 28 '11 at 20:04
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