Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm currently using joins inside my stored procedures for outputting elements from different tables. An aggressive example

select a.*, b.*, c.*, d.*, e.*, f.* from tableA a
join tableB b on a.id = b.foreignid
join tableC c on b.id = c.foreignid
join tableD d on c.id = d.foreignid
join tableE e on d.id = e.foreignid
join tableF f on e.id = f.foreignid
where a.id = 1

It's getting pretty unhandy to work with when mapping the output to entities in my C# code, since I have to maintain a lot of boilerplate code. Instead I would look into using multiple resultsets, so that I could map each resultset into an object type in code. But how would I go around achieving this when I my case the different results would all relate to each other? The examples I've been able to find all revolved around selecting from different tables where the data were not related by foreign keys like mine. If I were to ouput my result in multiple resultsets the only thing I can come up with is something like this

select a.* from tableA
where a.id = 1

select b.* from tableB
join tableA a on a.id = b.foreignid
where a.id = 1

select c.* from tableC
join tableB b on b.id = c.foreignid
join tableA on a.id = b.foreginid
where a.id = 1

select d.* from tableD
join tableC c on c.id = d.foreignid
join tableB b on b.id = c.foreignid
join tableA a on a.id = b.foreignid
where a.id = 1

select e.* from tableE
join tableD d on d.id = e.foreignid
join tableC c on c.id = d.foreignid
join tableB b on b.id = c.foreignid
join tableA a on a.id = b.foreignid
where a.id = 1    

select f.* from tableF
join tableE e on e.id = f.foreignid
join tableD d on d.id = e.foreignid
join tableC c on c.id = d.foreignid
join tableB b on b.id = c.foreignid
join tableA a on a.id = b.foreignid
where a.id = 1    

But this is not cleaner, a lot more ineffecient (I would suppose, since there's alot more join statements) Is it possible to use multiple resultset in this way I'm trying to? I just don't know how I would write the sql statements in the stored proc without having to do massive joins per resultset as in the example. And with the current solution I get an explosion of columns since I join them all together

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

You can actually return multiplte resultsets from a single SP and consume them in c#, check this post for instance : http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dditweb/archive/2008/05/06/linq-to-sql-and-multiple-result-sets-in-stored-procedures.aspx

It's a lesser known feature but sounds like what you're asking for. You don't have to join them and return them as a flattend rowset, just get the seperate rowsets and piece them together in memory.

Also you may want to read up on ORM frameworks, that could save you a lot of typing that you coud spend on features if it fits your needs. What ORM frameworks for .NET Do You Like Best?

Regards GJ

share|improve this answer
    
I know how to consume multiple resultsets in my code and I would use an ORM if I could. But it's a requirement that all our database access is using stored procedures. I do use linq to sql to use my stored procedures, but that really doesn't give me the full power of a ORM. My question is about if it's actually possible in a stored proc to return multiple resultsets when I actually need to join my data –  Xorandor Jun 28 '11 at 5:18
    
I'm not sure i understand, do you need multiple resultsets, have multiple selectt statements in your SP. If you need to join then join. Or do you want to link the objects you create form the resultsets together in a one-to-many way like in the db with foreign keys? –  gjvdkamp Jun 28 '11 at 5:44
    
A bit more sample code of what you want to achieve and the problems you run into would help here. –  gjvdkamp Jun 28 '11 at 5:58
    
I've added a better example, hope it makes more sense –  Xorandor Jun 28 '11 at 6:42
    
Ok i see... you could make this more efficient by keeping a table with redundant information, every key that links table e to table a. The pk of that table would be the E_id and then have other columns D_id to A_id. create a clustured index on A_id. Then you could lift the relevant section from each table by joining against that instead of every intermediate table. It would require some housekeeping to keep the redundant info up to date, but it should be the fastest solution. –  gjvdkamp Jun 28 '11 at 6:53
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.