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Suppose I am a user of a Certain Template Library (CTL) which defines a template, named, say, Hector

template <class T>
class Hector {...};

And in its documentation it gives many guarantees about Hector template behavior. But then it also defines a specialization for a certain type Cool

template <>
class Hector<Cool> {....};

The purpose of the specialization is a more optimized implementation of Hector, but unfortunately because of this optimization many guarantees of Hector are violated.

Currently I really don't need the optimization, I'd rather preserve all the guarantees of Hector. Is there any way I could, without changing the library code (CTL is a highly respectable library, you know), circumvent the specialization? Any way at all? Maybe write some sort of wrapper? Anything? I just want to the compiler to generate code for Hector<Cool> in a normal, non-optimized way, with all the guarantees.

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18  
Heh, subtle :-) –  Peter Alexander Jun 27 '11 at 21:15
5  
How about a wrapper class struct Stool : public Cool { };, and then use Hector<Stool>? –  Kerrek SB Jun 27 '11 at 21:16
8  
+1 for sheer hilarity. –  Platinum Azure Jun 27 '11 at 21:27
5  
Actually, class Hector has an additional template parameter, the Allevator. ;) –  Xeo Jun 27 '11 at 21:30
6  
@Xeo: ITYM Alligator. –  Steve Jessop Jun 27 '11 at 23:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Are you able to use the related template Reque that doesn't have the undesired specialization? Otherwise I think you'd need to create a wrapper for Cool so that the specialization isn't used.

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I wanted to post this, forgot about it and now remembered it. :( –  Xeo Jun 27 '11 at 21:39

You could wrap cool in a dummy type to prevent the template from specializing it.

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No. And even if it can be done in some esoteric fashion, don't. Circumventing language features should set off an alarm.

You have to wrap the value or use a different type like char instead of bool (they behave similarly), giving std::vector<char> instead of std::vector<bool>.

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4  
who mentionned STDs and vectors ? –  Alexandre C. Jun 27 '11 at 21:22
2  
I have a PhD in Buzzkilling. –  GManNickG Jun 27 '11 at 21:23
4  
@Armen : It's possible that Cool is larger than Shar but not smaller, and Shar is guaranteed to be able to hold all well-defined values of Cool. –  ildjarn Jun 27 '11 at 21:25
1  
@Armen: Correct, Cool can have any size, not necessarily one, but Shar definitely has a size of one. That said, you can do some magic (perhaps implementation-specific) to pick a non-Cool integral type that has the same size as Cool. –  GManNickG Jun 27 '11 at 21:28
2  
The more I think about this question, the more I think this is the right answer. After all, if what you want is for vector<bool> to behave "correctly", then you must be willing to take addresses of elements (after all, you did not tell what you expect precisely from Ctd::Hector<Cool>). Therefore, using another integral type really makes sense (and will have the same semantics as bool, contrarily to the solution other people suggest with a wrapper). The good news is that you can even choose the size of the implementation. –  Alexandre C. Jun 27 '11 at 21:32

Here's a little generic disguiser:

template <typename T>
struct Drool
{
  Drool(T d) : b(d) { }
  inline operator T() const { return b; }
  inline Drool<T> & operator=(T d) { b = d; return *this; }
private:
  T b;
};

Now you can say Hector<Drool<Cool>>.


Improved version according to Xeo:

template <typename T>
struct Drool
{
  Drool(const T & d) : b(d) { }
  Drool(Drool && o) = default;

  inline operator const T & () const { return b; }
  inline operator       T & ()       { return b; }

private:
  T b;
};
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2  
Could be made even more generic by taking parameters as const-refs and adding a move-ctor for C++0x, but other than that, yeah. Also, no need for an operator=, as that is implicitly defined. –  Xeo Jun 27 '11 at 21:36
    
@Xeo: Thanks, added! I was sort of prejudiced towards Cool... –  Kerrek SB Jun 27 '11 at 21:42
    
@Kerrek: Also, should be operator T&() and operator T const&() const. :) –  Xeo Jun 27 '11 at 22:16
    
@Xeo: I was actually wondering about that -- can the result of a cast be an lvalue? –  Kerrek SB Jun 27 '11 at 22:18
1  
@Kerrek: Uhm, sure? –  Xeo Jun 27 '11 at 22:19
  1. Open the standard certain implementation
  2. Ctrl+A
  3. Ctrl+C
  4. Create a new file called "my_hector.h"
  5. Ctrl+V
  6. Remove the specialisation
  7. Search and replace #include <hector> with #include "my_hector.h"
    [ Edit for @Xeo ;-) ]
  8. Rename identifiers that begin with two leading underscores followed by a lowercase letter, and all identifiers that begin with a single leading underscore following by an uppercase letter.
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1  
I like this solution, actually :) Why not? –  Armen Tsirunyan Jun 27 '11 at 21:29
4  
I don't like this solution because it gives up portability. –  Alexandre C. Jun 27 '11 at 21:35
1  
@Armen: I never said standard... /nonchalant –  Peter Alexander Jun 27 '11 at 21:38
2  
@Xaade: Umm, how is writing your own code equivalent to changing other code? –  Peter Alexander Jun 27 '11 at 21:54
1  
There is also an opportunity to break the ODR if you fail to replace hector by my_hector.h in all the indirectly included header files. So don't do this. Never. At least not on projects I'm working on. I wish I could downvote this more than once. –  Alexandre C. Jun 27 '11 at 22:16

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