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I am wondering is there a better way to change a dictionary key, for example:

var dic = new Dictionary<string, int>();
dic.Add("a", 1);

and later on I decided to make key value pair to be ("b" , 1) , is it possible to just rename the key rather than add a new key value pair of ("b",1) and then remove "a" ?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 25 down vote accepted

No, you cannot rename keys once that have been added to a Dictionary. If you want a rename facility, perhaps add your own extension method:

public static void RenameKey<TKey, TValue>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dic,
                                      TKey fromKey, TKey toKey)
{
  TValue value = dic[fromKey];
  dic.Remove(fromKey);
  dic[toKey] = value;
}
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A better naming is ChangeKey or UpdateKey :) –  nawfal Mar 31 '13 at 10:34
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The Dictionary in c# is implemented as a hashtable. Therefore, if you were able to change the key via some Dictionary.ChangeKey method, the entry would have to be re-hashed. So it's not really any different (aside from convenience) than removing the entry, and then adding it again with the new key.

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+1 for saying why it's no different than what he's doing now –  TruthOf42 Mar 17 at 13:37
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public static bool ChangeKey<TKey, TValue>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dict, 
                                           TKey oldKey, TKey newKey)
{
    TValue value;
    if (!dict.TryGetValue(oldKey, out value))
        return false;

    dict.Remove(oldKey);  // do not change order
    dict[newKey] = value;  // or dict.Add(newKey, value) depending on ur comfort
    return true;
}

Same as Colin's answer, but doesn't throw exception, instead returns false on failure. In fact I'm of the opinion that such a method should be default in dictionary class considering that editing the key value is dangerous, so the class itself should give us an option to be safe.

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