Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on a PHP based Model-View-Controller structured website. I understand that the Models should deal with business logic, views present HTML (or whatever) to the user, and the controllers facilitate this. Where I'm running stuck is with forms. How much processing do I put in the controller, and how much do I put the my model?

Assume that I'm trying to update a user's first & last name. What I want to do is submit a form using AJAX to one of my controllers. I want the data to be validated (again) server side, and if valid save it to the database, and then return a JSON response back to the view, as either a success or error.

Should I create an instance of my user model in the controller, or should I just have the controller relay to a static method in my model? Here is two examples of how this could work:

Option #1: Process POST in Model

<form action="/user/edit-user-form-submit/" method="post">
    <input type="text" name="firstname">
    <input type="text" name="lastname">
    <button type="submit">Save</button>
</form>

<?php
    class user
    {
        public function __construct($id){} // load user from database
        public function set_firstname(){} // validate and set first name
        public function set_lastname(){} // validate and set last name
        public function save_to_database(){} // save object fields to database

        public static function save_data_from_post()
        {
            // Load the user
            $user = new user($_POST['id']);

            // Was the record found in the db?
            if($user->exists)
            {
                // Try to set these fields
                if(
                    $user->set_firstname($_POST['firstname'])
                    and
                    $user->set_lastname($_POST['lastname'])
                )
                {
                    // No errors, save to the dabase
                    $user->save_to_database();

                    // Return success to view
                    echo json_encode(array('success' => true));
                }
                else
                {
                    // Error, data not valid!
                    echo json_encode(array('success' => false));
                }
            }
            else
            {
                // Error, user not found!
                echo json_encode(array('success' => false));
            }
        }   
    }

    class user_controller extends controller
    {
        public function edit_user_form()
        {
            $view = new view('edit_user_form.php');
        }
        public function edit_user_form_submit()
        {
            user::save_data_from_post();
        }
    }
?>

Option #1: Process POST in Model

<form action="/user/edit-user-form-submit/" method="post">
    <input type="text" name="firstname">
    <input type="text" name="lastname">
    <button type="submit">Save</button>
</form>

<?php
    class user
    {
        public function __construct($id){} // load user from database
        public function set_firstname(){} // validate and set first name
        public function set_lastname(){} // validate and set last name
        public function save_to_database(){} // save object fields to database
    }

    class user_controller extends controller
    {
        public function edit_user_form()
        {
            $view = new view('edit_user_form.php');
        }
        public function edit_user_form_submit()
        {
            // Load the user
            $user = new user($_POST['id']);

            // Was the record found in the db?
            if($user->exists)
            {
                // Try to set these fields
                if(
                    $user->set_firstname($_POST['firstname'])
                    and
                    $user->set_lastname($_POST['lastname'])
                )
                {
                    // No errors, save to the dabase
                    $user->save_to_database();

                    // Return success to view
                    echo json_encode(array('success' => true));
                }
                else
                {
                    // Error, data not valid!
                    echo json_encode(array('success' => false));
                }
            }
            else
            {
                // Error, user not found!
                echo json_encode(array('success' => false));
            }
        }
    }
?>

The two examples do the exact same thing, I realize that. But is there a right and wrong way of doing this? I've read a lot about skinny controllers and fat models, where is where option #1 came from. How are you handling this? Thanks, and sorry for the long question!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Put shortly, you can use either of these approaches - but you should change them a bit.

Consider this: The models don't really "know" about post, get and whatnot. They should only know about whatever business-related thing they are - in your case a user.

So while approach #1 can be used, you should not access post variables directly from the model. Instead, make the function take an array of parameters which are then used to create the user.

This way you can easily reuse the code, say in a shell script or whatever, where there is no such thing as $_POST.

While the second approach is more verbose in the controller, it's something you could do too. However, perhaps a bit better approach in the style is to use a "service class". The service would have a method, let's say "createUserFromArray", which takes an array and returns a user. Again, you would pass this method the $_POST as parameters - similar to how you should pass them into the function in modified #1.

Only the controller should deal with inputs directly. This is because the controller handles the request, and thus it can know about post.

tl;dr your models should never use superglobals like $_POST directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for your input as well. Good to know about not accessing globals within models...that makes sense. Interesting idea on the service class. Would you limit the functionality of the service class to just one method (ie. creating a new user from an array), or would it make sense to add other functions as well, like update_user_from_array? Also, for both of these functions, would you force a specific number of values in the array, or would you let the function simply process what was passed to it (ie. firstname & lastname and another time username & password)? –  Jonathan Jun 27 '11 at 22:48
    
Generally speaking services usually would contain any number of methods related to some specific type of model. For example, you could have a user service which contains different methods for interacting with user models. I think the arrays for the methods could contain any number of values, but you should check for the values that you actually want, and if a required value is missng, throw an exception. This concept is called a "service layer" if you want to look up more info. –  Jani Hartikainen Jun 27 '11 at 22:53
    
A service layer, never thought of that! However, isn't a service layer typically used when working with multiple domain models? I like the idea, but could that be overkill in a typical small web app? –  Jonathan Jun 27 '11 at 23:32
    
Assuming you have a slightly more complex action you could have a service which only uses a single model. And yeah, I agree that it can be overkill in a simpler app - However, at the point where you find that you may need to copypaste your code around, it might be a good idea to consider moving some of it to a service –  Jani Hartikainen Jun 27 '11 at 23:35
    
Just reading more about service layers, I think you really nailed what I was struggling with. I kept reading "keep your controllers" thin...but then didn't know where to put that logic. Thanks a lot for your input. For those interested in reading more about services layers, checkout this blog article, it does a great job of explaining this. –  Jonathan Jun 28 '11 at 0:01

From my point of view and the way we're doing it at work, model will handle the validation and filtering of datas that are passed to it, but we use the controller to push thoose datas inside the model.

Has stated in above comments, the model don't have to know about $_POST or $_GET these are user input that the controller has to deal with. In the other hand the model must handle all verification of datas passed to it as you definitely don't want to make again and again your data validation in different code portion of your project.

share|improve this answer

A big reason for the MVC design pattern is that it's a good way of maintaining Separation of Concerns. The View should be ignorant of the Model, and vice-versa. The Controller is there only as a sort of traffic cop mediating between the Model and the View. So the Controller should take the data from the View, do the minimal processing needed so that the Model can understand the data without needing to know how the View is implemented (i.e. via an HTML form), and give it to the Model so the model can persist the data.

This makes it so the Model can be reused in other instances when an item needs to be created / saved / persisted by other means than an HTML form, without duplicating item-saving code across multiple Controllers.

UPDATE: I forgot to mention validation. Along the same lines as for persisting the data, the Controller should take the data and pass it to the Model for validation, since the Model is the one that knows the exact format of the data it needs. You could combine validation and persistence by having the Model throw an exception if the data is invalid, which the Controller can catch and deal with as necessary (e.g. render JSON error response.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking the time to explain that, that's helpful. Although I must admit model/view relationship is one I struggle with. Accessing models in a view is just too darn easy, and I don't really see how having the controller relay this information helps. Maybe you can elaborate? –  Jonathan Jun 28 '11 at 0:07
1  
@Jonathan: Yeah, it can be hard to justify having so many layers of code abstraction, especially if it's a small project. Object-Oriented design does add complexity in the early stages of a project. But the beauty is if you later need to expand, you don't have to refactor a whole bunch of code just to avoid duplicated functionality. What if you add a Web API later down the road? What if you eventually need to change your data storage system? The changes to your codebase are much less comprehensive if everything is already in manageable, extensible chunks, which saves tons of time. –  curtisdf Jun 28 '11 at 22:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.