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I'm using Spring/JPA2/hibernate with this code:

class A {
  @Autowired
  B b;

  @RequestMapping("/test")
  public void test(final HttpServletRequest r1, HttpServletResponse r2) throws ... {

    b.inner();   // Works

    b.outer();   // javax.persistence.TransactionRequiredException: 
                 // no transaction is in progress ... :|
}

@Component
class B {
   @PersistenceContext
   EntityManager em;

   public void outer() { inner(); }

   @Transactional
   public void inner() { em.flush(); }
}

Why does inner() only when called indirectly loose the transaction?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/current/reference/transaction.html#transaction-declarative-annotations

In proxy mode (which is the default), only external method calls coming in through the proxy are intercepted. This means that self-invocation, in effect, a method within the target object calling another method of the target object, will not lead to an actual transaction at runtime even if the invoked method is marked with @Transactional.

Consider the use of AspectJ mode (see mode attribute in table below) if you expect self-invocations to be wrapped with transactions as well. In this case, there will not be a proxy in the first place; instead, the target class will be weaved (that is, its byte code will be modified) in order to turn @Transactional into runtime behavior on any kind of method.

The @Autowired reference B b (inside class A), is wrapped with a Spring AOP transaction-aware proxy.

When b.inner() is called, you are invoking it on the transaction-aware instance, and it is marked as @Transactional. Thus a Spring managed transaction is started.

When b.outer() is called, it is also on a transaction-aware instance, but it is not @Transactional. Thus a Spring managed transaction is not started.

Once you are inside the invocation of outer() the call to inner() is not going through the transaction-aware proxy, it is being invoked directly. It is the same as this.inner(). Since you are invoking it directly, and not through the proxy, it does not have the Spring transaction-aware semantics.

Since no transaction has been started, this results in the TransactionRequiredException.

Possible solutions include making the method outer() @Transactional.

   @Transactional
   public void outer() { inner(); }

Or making the entire class @Transactional.

@Transactional   
@Component
class B {
   @PersistenceContext
   EntityManager em;
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My goal was to create a background program and commit small bits each time. So annotating outer() as a singular transaction is not my intent. I'm off changing proxy mode to aspect-j mode. Thanks! –  Cojones Jun 28 '11 at 0:10
    
If the logic in B.outer() needs to happen before B.inner() but is not involved in transaction/persistence, it likely doesn't belong in your persistence layer classes (DAL/DAO etc). Consider refactoring your design to separate the concerns, possibly though use of an intermediate object. Object intermediate = b.outer(); b.inner(intermediate);. And then refactor, so that it is no longer a member of your persistence layer classes. Object intermediate = someOtherUtilityOrSupportClassInstance.outer(); b.inner(intermediate);. –  Dan Jun 28 '11 at 0:56
    
I've switched to LTW now, but i'm getting no transaction in any call now :( All config is added <context:annotation-config/>, <tx:annotation-driven mode="aspectj".., <context:load-time-weaver aspectj-weaving="on" and TomcatInstrumentableClassLoader, etc. Are you sure it's possible? This post thinks JPA/Hibernate/LTW can't be done: stackoverflow.com/questions/2536292/… "load-time weaver SHOULD NOT be used with Hibernate, this is for Toplink)" Or do i need compile time weaving? –  Cojones Jun 29 '11 at 22:07
    
I've personally never worked with LTW (because of restrictive security requirements and the use of java agents/instrumentation), so someone else will need to chime in, or you should raise a new question. It's still not clear to me from the derived example, why your design shouldn't be using proxy/interceptor approach; provided you refactor your transactional scopes appropriately, or removing the nested transactional code which looks (at least from the example) to be code-smell. –  Dan Jun 30 '11 at 5:00
    
I've Got aspectj-LTW working now, no more exception. Thanks. –  Cojones Jul 4 '11 at 22:16

The transactional context lasts over the scope of your spring bean's entire lifespan. @Transactional notation has a scope of the entire component and you should annotate your @Component as @Transactional eg

@Transactional
@Component
class B {
    @PersistenceContext 
    EntityManager em;

    public inner() { }
    public outer() { }
}

The methods inner and outer should accomplish individual units of work. If you need some helper function or what have you that is fine, but the unit of work that requires the transactional boundary should be scoped to each method. See the spring docs on @Transactional http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.0.x/reference/transaction.html

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