Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this method of sorting which is basically just basic thought processes, not using Perl power, and once in a while it doesn't act how I want it (misses some frequency counting). I was wondering if there was a better way to sort this.

Objective Sort the array based on frequency of matches found.

Sample array of arrays

##ADDED 1 to END of EACH ROW, just because my sort forced me too!!!
my @all_matches = (["chpt10_2", "sent. 2", "alice", "nsubj", "animals", "protect"],
               ["chpt12_1", "sent. 54", "bob", "nsubj", "cells", "protect"],
               ["chpt25_4", "sent. 47", "carol", "nsubj", "plants", "protect"],
               ["chpt34_1", "sent. 1", "dave", "nsubj", "cells", "protect"],
               ["chpt35_1", "sent. 2", "eli", "nsubj", "cells", "protect"],
               ["chpt38_1", "sent. 1", "fred", "nsubj", "animals", "protect"],
               ["chpt54_1", "sent. 1", "greg", "nsubj", "uticle", "protect"]
              );

Current sort

@all_matches = sort {lc($a->[4]) cmp lc($b->[4])} @all_matches;

my ($last_word, $current_word, $word_count);

for my $j (0 .. $#all_matches) {

    $current_word = $all_matches[$j][4];

    if (lc($last_word) eq lc($current_word)) {
        $word_count++;
        }
    else {
        if ($j != 0)
        {
            for (my $k = 1; $k <= $word_count; $k++)
            {
               $all_matches[($j-$k)][6] = $word_count; 
            }
        }
        $last_word = $current_word;
        $word_count = 1;
        }
}
@all_matches = sort {$b->[6] <=> $a->[6] || lc($a->[4]) cmp lc($b->[4])} @all_matches;

Problem The 6th column is set to 1 when all_matches is passed in!!! The reason this was done was because sometimes, the count ($match->[6]) was blank.

Bonus? Match frequency of times the last two columns appear together (right now I'm pretty sure it just checks 2nd last column). In this test case, the final column is all the same, in the actual case, there are different suffixes on the end (ie. protect, protects, protective etc..)

THANKS a lot for your time. I've tried using a hash, and thought it worked, however it neglected some things.

Here was my hash attempt. Couldn't tell you yet why this didn't work:

my %freq;
foreach ( map{$_->[4]}@results) #feeds in list of animals, cells, uticle, etc.
{
   $freq{lc $_}++;
}


@results = sort {$freq{lc $b->[4]} <=> $freq{lc $a->[4]} #freq order
                                   or
                         $a->[0]  cmp $b->[0]            #text col 0      
                } @results; 
share|improve this question
    
A small observation: No need to lc() in your loop, since all your input has already been lc()'ed. –  Flimzy Jun 28 '11 at 0:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Why not create a hash of the keys with a count of the occurrences, and use that:

my %counts;
foreach my $rowref (@all_matches)
{
     $counts{lc($rowref->[4])}++;
}

@all_matches = sort { $counts{lc($b->[4])} <=> $counts{lc($a->[4])} ||
                      lc($a->[4]) cmp lc($b->[4])
                    } @all_matches;

Tested...

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @all_matches = (
    ["chpt10_2", "sent. 2", "alice", "nsubj", "animals", "protect"],
    ["chpt12_1", "sent. 54", "bob", "nsubj", "cells", "protect"],
    ["chpt25_4", "sent. 47", "carol", "nsubj", "plants", "protect"],
    ["chpt34_1", "sent. 1", "dave", "nsubj", "cells", "protect"],
    ["chpt35_1", "sent. 2", "eli", "nsubj", "cells", "protect"],
    ["chpt38_1", "sent. 1", "fred", "nsubj", "animals", "protect"],
    ["chpt54_1", "sent. 1", "greg", "nsubj", "uticle", "protect"]
    );

my %counts;
foreach my $rowref (@all_matches)
{
    $counts{lc($rowref->[4])}++;
}

@all_matches = sort { $counts{lc($b->[4])} <=> $counts{lc($a->[4])} ||
                      lc($a->[4]) cmp lc($b->[4])
                    } @all_matches;

my $i = 0;
foreach my $rowref (@all_matches)
{
    $i++;
    print "$i";
    print " $_" foreach (@$rowref);
    print "\n";
}

Output:

1 chpt12_1 sent. 54 bob nsubj cells protect
2 chpt34_1 sent. 1 dave nsubj cells protect
3 chpt35_1 sent. 2 eli nsubj cells protect
4 chpt10_2 sent. 2 alice nsubj animals protect
5 chpt38_1 sent. 1 fred nsubj animals protect
6 chpt25_4 sent. 47 carol nsubj plants protect
7 chpt54_1 sent. 1 greg nsubj uticle protect

As noted in a comment, given the data shown, the lc operations are not needed - and removing them would improve performance, as would adding a case-converted key to each array.

And with lc used once per row - notice the munged data values:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @all_matches = (
    [ "chpt10_2", "sent. 2",  "alice", "nsubj", "animAls", "protect" ],
    [ "chpt12_1", "sent. 54", "bob",   "nsubj", "celLs",   "protect" ],
    [ "chpt25_4", "sent. 47", "carol", "nsubj", "plAnts",  "protect" ],
    [ "chpt34_1", "sent. 1",  "dave",  "nsubj", "cElls",   "protect" ],
    [ "chpt35_1", "sent. 2",  "eli",   "nsubj", "cells",   "protect" ],
    [ "chpt38_1", "sent. 1",  "fred",  "nsubj", "Animals", "protect" ],
    [ "chpt54_1", "sent. 1",  "greg",  "nsubj", "uticle",  "protect" ],
    );

my %counts;
foreach my $rowref (@all_matches)
{
    push @$rowref, lc($rowref->[4]);
    $counts{$rowref->[6]}++;
}

@all_matches = sort { $counts{$b->[6]} <=> $counts{$a->[6]} || $a->[6] cmp $b->[6]
                    } @all_matches;

my $i = 0;
foreach my $rowref (@all_matches)
{
    $i++;
    print "$i";
    printf " %-9s", $_ foreach (@$rowref);
    print "\n";
}

Output:

1 chpt12_1  sent. 54  bob       nsubj     celLs     protect   cells    
2 chpt34_1  sent. 1   dave      nsubj     cElls     protect   cells    
3 chpt35_1  sent. 2   eli       nsubj     cells     protect   cells    
4 chpt10_2  sent. 2   alice     nsubj     animAls   protect   animals  
5 chpt38_1  sent. 1   fred      nsubj     Animals   protect   animals  
6 chpt25_4  sent. 47  carol     nsubj     plAnts    protect   plants   
7 chpt54_1  sent. 1   greg      nsubj     uticle    protect   uticle   
share|improve this answer
    
From more testing, I've found a few cases where each method has the advantage. The problem with yours is sometimes, whenI print: $counts{$match->[4]} as the number, although the actual match appears in the right place, there is no number there as there is everywhere else (an uninitialized value error)? I'll keep looking into this. Thanks... Further research has shown it happens when the word begins with upper case –  Jon Jun 28 '11 at 2:38
    
So far, by printing with $counts{lc $match->[4]}, eliminates that error. –  Jon Jun 28 '11 at 2:48
1  
@Jon: you could also eliminate it in the last example by using subscript 6 instead of 4. I carefully stored the canonical (lower-case) key value there for (re)use when accessing the counts. That's why the second full program compares on $counts{$b->[6]} instead of using $counts{$b->[4]}. As long as you are consistent, all will be OK. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 28 '11 at 4:02

Try this one:

my @all_matches = (["chpt10_2", "sent. 2", "alice", "nsubj", "animals", "protect"],
        ["chpt12_1", "sent. 54", "bob", "nsubj", "cells", "protect"],
        ["chpt25_4", "sent. 47", "carol", "nsubj", "plants", "protect"],
        ["chpt34_1", "sent. 1", "dave", "nsubj", "cells", "protect"],
        ["chpt35_1", "sent. 2", "eli", "nsubj", "cells", "protect"],
        ["chpt38_1", "sent. 1", "fred", "nsubj", "animals", "protect"],
        ["chpt54_1", "sent. 1", "greg", "nsubj", "uticle", "protect"]
        );

my %wordcount;

foreach my $row (@all_matches) {
        $wordcount{$row->[4]}++;
}

my @sorted = sort { $wordcount{$b->[4]} <=> $wordcount{$a->[4]}  } @all_matches;
share|improve this answer
1  
That doesn't reliably sort in alphabetical order when the counts are tied. Otherwise, very similar to mine - I preserved the lc operations in the original where you opted not to. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 28 '11 at 0:51
    
you are right, missed it, its late here. And you was first, was writing while you posted ;) –  Thomas Berger Jun 28 '11 at 0:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.