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I feel using Git submodules is some how troublesome for my development workflow. I also learn that Git subtree and gitslave might be the solution after that. Which one is the best option to go? I can't find any comparison information about these 2 options. Does these 2 has windows version to work with?

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Are you talking about the Git subtree merge strategy or Avery Pennarun's git-subtree? The two are fundamentally not the same. –  kynan Apr 13 '12 at 23:31
    
A good read here codingkilledthecat.wordpress.com/2012/04/28/… –  nawfal Feb 24 '13 at 0:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 48 down vote accepted

Which is best for you depends on your needs, desires, and workflow. They are in some senses semi-isomorphic, it is just some are a lot easier to use than others for specific tasks.

  • gitslave is useful when you control and develop on the subprojects at more of less the same time as the superproject, and furthermore when you typically want to tag, branch, push, pull, etc all repositories at the same time. gitslave has never been tested on windows that I know of. It requires perl.

  • git-submodule is better when you do not control the subprojects or more specifically wish to fix the subproject at a specific revision even as the subproject changes. git-submodule is a standard part of git and thus would work on windows.

  • git-subtree provides a front-end to git's built-in subtree merge strategy. It is better when you prefer to have a single-repository "unified" git history. Unlike the subtree merge strategy, it is easier to export changes to the different (directory) trees back out to the original project, but it is not as automatic as it is with gitslave or even git-submodule.

  • repo is in theory similar to gitslave, but not as well documented for non-android operations that I have found. It is fairly dedicated to the Google Android development model and only natively supports a handful of git commands (though you can run arbitrary commands) and the limited native support doesn't support, for example, a centralized repository to push to and checking out a branch seems fairly difficult.

  • kitenet's mr is what you would want to use if you have multiple version control systems in use, but is mostly limited for git-only superprojects due to its lowest common denominator approach. There are ways to run arbitrary commands, but they are not as well integrated.

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Note that git-subtree in this answer refers to (as mentioned) to the Git subtree merge strategy and not Avery Pennarun's git-subtree, which are fundamentally not the same. The latter was explicitly designed to allow contributing changes back from the subtree. –  kynan Apr 13 '12 at 23:33
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Great breakdown! I'd love to see it amended to differentiate "subtree merge" from git-subtree as @kynan mentions. –  BrianTheLion Oct 12 '12 at 3:22
    
mr isn't limited to the lowest-common denominator, all git commands are available (including the ones with no equivalent anywhere). –  Tobu Nov 4 '12 at 23:52
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@kynan: in addition to your comment. I would like to point out that Avery's Pennarun's git-subtree is now available in git 1.7.11 and higher. –  sealTrip Nov 13 '12 at 23:06
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@sealTrip: available as in it's in git/contrib. Install in Ubuntu with sudo make install install-doc prefix=/usr libexecdir=/usr/lib/git-core from a Git source tree (does not work with the packaged Git). –  kynan Nov 22 '12 at 20:00

I currently use submodules for development and not just relating 3rd party libraries. There are some ways that you can make life easier with submodules, especially when they are the source of merge or rebase conflicts. Look to ls-tree to get the 2 commits involved on a conflict in the submodule. This is probably the most difficult part of submodules for people to deal with. For now scripting will make this much easier to work with. Future versions of Git should have better native support for dealing with them.

Hope this helps.

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