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When I have the following:

class Foo
  def bar
    puts "#{__method__} was called and found within #{self}"
  end

  def method_missing(meth, *args, &blk)
    puts "#{meth} was called and was not found within #{self}"
  end
end

foo = Foo.new
foo.bar 
# => bar was called and found within #<Foo:0x100138a98>
foo.baz 
# => baz was called and was not found within #<Foo:0x100138a98>

I assume that when the method is found, the method dispatch looks a bit like so:

foo.bar was asked to be called
Search methods defined within #<Foo:0x100138a98>
Method `bar` found
Call the `bar` method

And for methods not found:

foo.baz was asked to be called
Search methods defined within #<Foo:0x100138a98>
Method `baz` not found 
Search methods defined within the parent of #<Foo:0x100138a98>
Method `baz` not found
And so on until it hits the parent that has no parent
Loop back around and see if #<Foo:0x100138a98> has a `method_missing` method defined
Method `method_missing` found
Call the `method_missing` method

I would like to step in like so:

foo.bar was asked to be called
Search methods defined within #<Foo:0x100138a98> to see it has a `method_dispatched` method
Method `method_dispatched` found
Calling `method_dispatched`
Search methods defined within #<Foo:0x100138a98>
...

This would allow developers to do something like below:

class Foo
  def bar
    puts "#{__method__} was called and found within #{self}"
  end

  def method_missing(meth, *args, &blk)
    puts "#{meth} was called and was not found within #{self}"
  end

  def method_dispatched(meth, *args, &blk)
    puts "#{meth} was called within #{self}..."
    puts "continuing with the method dispatch..."
  end
end

foo = Foo.new
foo.bar 
# => bar was called within #<Foo:0x100138a98>...
# => continuing with the method dispatch...
# => bar was called and found within #<Foo:0x100138a98>
foo.baz 
# => bar was called within #<Foo:0x100138a98>...
# => continuing with the method dispatch...
# => baz was called and was not found within #<Foo:0x100138a98>

This brings me to the question..

Is this possible?

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1  
There's more to finding a method than just a class and its parents. You might find this article useful if you haven't already: blog.rubybestpractices.com/posts/gregory/… –  Jeremy Heiler Jun 28 '11 at 3:32
    
@c00lryguy: Are you downvoting me because I answered the question you originally asked? –  Andrew Grimm Jun 28 '11 at 3:35
    
Well it just wasn't relevant to the question. I only changed the title. It was like you read the title, skipped the body and answered it. –  RyanScottLewis Jun 28 '11 at 3:37
    
@c00lryguy: I'll delete the answer if you get rid of the downvote. –  Andrew Grimm Jun 28 '11 at 3:44
    
"You last voted on this answer 1 hour ago Your vote is now locked in unless this answer is edited" So edit it, then I'll un-downvote, then delete. =p –  RyanScottLewis Jun 28 '11 at 4:23
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2 Answers

I'm not aware of a callback for what you're looking for. I would read up on Ruby Delegators for a possible solution that's more elegant than what I've sketched below.

You can wrap the object and intercept on method_missing.

class A
  def foo
    puts "hi there, I'm A"
  end 
end 

maybe have B inherit A? 
class B 
  def initialize 
    @a = A.new
  end 

  def method_missing(m, *args, &block)
    puts "hi there, I'm in B"
    @a.send(m, *args, &block) if @a.respond_to? m
    puts "all done"
  end 
end 
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Sort of a Ruby beginner here, but I have some working solution. So please comment on the code if you think something is not ruby-esque.

The idea is to alias the methods that you have and undef_method the original method. This will create a alias for all your instance methods. You can then have a method_missing that can call method_dispatched and then the actual method.

class Test
        def foo
                "foo"
        end

        def method_dispatched(meth, *args, &blk)
                puts "#{meth} was called within #{self}..."
                puts "continuing with the method dispatch..."
        end

        def method_missing(name, *args, &block)
                method_dispatched(name, args, block)  #Calls your standard dispatcher

                if (respond_to?('_' + name.to_s)) # Check if we have a aliased method
                        send('_' + name.to_s)
                else
                        "undef"    #Let the caller know that we cant handle this.
                end
        end

        instance_methods(false).each do |meth|
                if meth != 'method_missing' and meth != 'method_dispatched'
                        alias_method "_#{meth}", meth
                        remove_method(meth)
                end
        end

end

t = Test.new
puts t.foo()
puts t.undefined_method()
share|improve this answer
    
Just curious. Did you get a chance to try this out? –  rajasaur Jun 30 '11 at 14:10
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