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int main()
{
    switch(std::string("raj")) //Compilation error - switch expression of type illegal 
    {
    case"sda":
    }

}
share|improve this question
1  
Is there a boost alternative that hides the map construction,enum behind a MACRO? – balki Mar 2 '12 at 15:07

14 Answers 14

up vote 100 down vote accepted

The reason why has to do with the type system. C/C++ doesn't really support strings as a type. It does support the idea of a constant char array but it doesn't really fully understand the notion of a string.

In order to generate the code for a switch statement the compiler must understand what it means for two values to be equal. For items like ints and enums, this is a trivial bit comparison. But how should the compiler compare 2 string values? Case sensitive, insensitive, culture aware, etc ... Without a full awareness of a string this cannot be accurately answered.

Additionally, C/C++ switch statements are typically generated as branch tables. It's not nearly as easy to generate a branch table for a string style switch.

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3  
The branch table argument shouldn't apply - that's only one possible approach available to a compiler author. For a production compiler, one has to frequently use several approaches depending on the complexity of the switch. – plinth Mar 16 '09 at 13:32
2  
@plinth, I put it there mostly for historical reasons. A lot of the "why does C/C++ do this" questions can easily be answered by the history of the compiler. At the time they wrote it, C was glorified assembly and hence switch really was a convenient branch table. – JaredPar Mar 16 '09 at 13:34
1  
@plinth (cont) yes they could have updated it since then but C/C++ is annoyingly slow at changing the way they do things. For instance, it took till C99 to get a boolean type into C! – JaredPar Mar 16 '09 at 13:35
16  
I vote down because i don't understand how could the compiler knows how to compare 2 string values in if statements but forget the way to do the same thing in switch statements. – user955249 Jun 12 '12 at 8:45
3  
I don't think the first 2 paragraphs are valid reasons. Especially since C++14 when std::string literals were added. It is mostly historical. But one problem that does come to mind is that with the way switch works currently, duplicate cases must be detected at compile-time; however this might not be so easy for strings (considering run-time locale selection and so on). I suppose that such a thing would have to require constexpr cases, or add in unspecified behaviour (never a thing that we want to do). – M.M Jun 11 '15 at 23:37

As mentioned previously, compilers like to build lookup tables that optimize switch statements to near O(1) timing whenever possible. Combine this with the fact that the C++ Language doesn't have a string type - std::string is part of the Standard Library which is not part of the Language per se.

I will offer an alternative that you might want to consider, I've used it in the past to good effect. Instead of switching over the string itself, switch over the result of a hash function that uses the string as input. Your code will be almost as clear as switching over the string if you are using a predetermined set of strings:

enum string_code {
    eFred,
    eBarney,
    eWilma,
    eBetty,
    ...
};

string_code hashit (std::string const& inString) {
    if (inString == "Fred") return eFred;
    if (inString == "Barney") return eBarney;
    ...
}

void foo() {
    switch (hashit(stringValue)) {
    case eFred:
        ...
    case eBarney:
        ...
    }
}

There are a bunch of obvious optimizations that pretty much follow what the C compiler would do with a switch statement... funny how that happens.

share|improve this answer
    
This is really disappointing because you are not actually hashing. With modern C++ you can actually hash at compile time using a constexpr hash function. Your solution looks clean but has all that nasty if ladder going on unfortunately. The map solutions below would be better and avoid the function call as well. Additionally by using two maps you can have built in text for error logging as well. – Dirk Bester May 20 at 18:18

You can only use switch on primitive such as int, char and enum. The easiest solution to do it like you want to, is to use an enum.

#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <iostream.h>

// Value-Defintions of the different String values
static enum StringValue { evNotDefined,
                          evStringValue1,
                          evStringValue2,
                          evStringValue3,
                          evEnd };

// Map to associate the strings with the enum values
static std::map<std::string, StringValue> s_mapStringValues;

// User input
static char szInput[_MAX_PATH];

// Intialization
static void Initialize();

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  // Init the string map
  Initialize();

  // Loop until the user stops the program
  while(1)
  {
    // Get the user's input
    cout << "Please enter a string (end to terminate): ";
    cout.flush();
    cin.getline(szInput, _MAX_PATH);
    // Switch on the value
    switch(s_mapStringValues[szInput])
    {
      case evStringValue1:
        cout << "Detected the first valid string." << endl;
        break;
      case evStringValue2:
        cout << "Detected the second valid string." << endl;
        break;
      case evStringValue3:
        cout << "Detected the third valid string." << endl;
        break;
      case evEnd:
        cout << "Detected program end command. "
             << "Programm will be stopped." << endl;
        return(0);
      default:
        cout << "'" << szInput
             << "' is an invalid string. s_mapStringValues now contains "
             << s_mapStringValues.size()
             << " entries." << endl;
        break;
    }
  }

  return 0;
}

void Initialize()
{
  s_mapStringValues["First Value"] = evStringValue1;
  s_mapStringValues["Second Value"] = evStringValue2;
  s_mapStringValues["Third Value"] = evStringValue3;
  s_mapStringValues["end"] = evEnd;

  cout << "s_mapStringValues contains "
       << s_mapStringValues.size()
       << " entries." << endl;
}

Code written by Stefan Ruck on July 25th, 2001.

share|improve this answer
    
Why is this downvoted? It's a fairly good solution. (It would be better if the globals were made const somehow, though. Perhaps an accessor which initializes once, hinding the actual "const" map.) – strager Mar 16 '09 at 12:45
3  
Better still, using "std::map<std::string, some_function_pointer>" would eliminate the need for the switch. It would also keep the function that contained the switch from becoming excessively large. – Skizz Mar 16 '09 at 13:40
36  
Blatantly plagiarized from: codeguru.com/cpp/cpp/cpp_mfc/article.php/c4067 – jmanning2k Jan 13 '11 at 3:24

The problem is that for reasons of optimization the switch statement in C++ does not work on anything but primitive types, and you can only compare them with compile time constants.

Presumably the reason for the restriction is that the compiler is able to apply some form of optimization compiling the code down to one cmp instruction and a goto where the address is computed based on the value of the argument at runtime. Since branching and and loops don't play nicely with modern CPUs, this can be an important optimization.

To go around this, I am afraid you will have to resort to if statements.

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1  
Not all primitive types work either. Only integral types. – Drew Dormann Mar 16 '09 at 20:33

C++ 11 update of apparently not @MarmouCorp above but http://www.codeguru.com/cpp/cpp/cpp_mfc/article.php/c4067/Switch-on-Strings-in-C.htm

Uses two maps to convert between the strings and the class enum (better than plain enum because its values are scoped inside it, and reverse lookup for nice error messages).

The use of static in the codeguru code is possible with compiler support for initializer lists which means VS 2013 plus. gcc 4.8.1 was ok with it, not sure how much farther back it would be compatible.

/// <summary>
/// Enum for String values we want to switch on
/// </summary>
enum class TestType
{
    SetType,
    GetType
};

/// <summary>
/// Map from strings to enum values
/// </summary>
std::map<std::string, TestType> MnCTest::s_mapStringToTestType =
{
    { "setType", TestType::SetType },
    { "getType", TestType::GetType }
};

/// <summary>
/// Map from enum values to strings
/// </summary>
std::map<TestType, std::string> MnCTest::s_mapTestTypeToString
{
    {TestType::SetType, "setType"}, 
    {TestType::GetType, "getType"}, 
};

...

std::string someString = "setType";
TestType testType = s_mapStringToTestType[someString];
switch (testType)
{
    case TestType::SetType:
        break;

    case TestType::GetType:
        break;

    default:
        LogError("Unknown TestType ", s_mapTestTypeToString[testType]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I should note that I later found a solution requiring string literals and compile time calculations (C++ 14 or 17 I think) where you can hash the case strings at compile time and hash the switch string at runtime. It would be worthwhile for really long switches perhaps but certainly even less backwards compatible if that matters. – Dirk Bester Oct 10 '15 at 18:27

In C++ and C switches only work on integer types. Use an if else ladder instead. C++ could obviously have implemented some sort of swich statement for strings - I guess nobody thought it worthwhile, and I agree with them.

share|improve this answer
    
agreed,but do you know what made this not possible to use – yesraaj Mar 16 '09 at 12:22
    
History? Switching on real numbers, pointers and structs (C's only other data types) doesn't make sanse, so C limitted it to integers. – anon Mar 16 '09 at 12:24
    
Especially if you switch on classes that allow implicit conversions you'll have a really good time once. – sharptooth Mar 16 '09 at 12:27

In C++ you can only use a switch statement on int and char

share|improve this answer
    
enum turns into int?? – yesraaj Mar 16 '09 at 12:17
1  
A char turns into an int, too. – strager Mar 16 '09 at 12:43
    
Pointers can, too. That means you can sometimes compile something that would make sense in a different language, but it won't run right. – David Thornley Mar 16 '09 at 13:31
    
You can actually use long and long long, which won't turn into int. There's no risk of truncation there. – MSalters Feb 5 '15 at 10:12

I think the reason is that in C strings are not primitive types, as tomjen said, think in a string as a char array, so you can not do things like:

switch (char[]) { // ...
switch (int[]) { // ...
share|improve this answer
3  
Without looking it up, a character array would likely degenerate to a char *, which converts directly to an integral type. So, it might well compile, but it certainly won't do what you want. – David Thornley Mar 16 '09 at 13:30
1  
well.. maybe you can.. but sure you should not do it.. :P – grilix Mar 16 '09 at 13:58

In c++ strings are not first class citizens. The string operations are done through standard library. I think, that is the reason. Also, C++ uses branch table optimization to optimize the switch case statements. Have a look at the link.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switch_statement

share|improve this answer

You can't use string in switch case.Only int & char are allowed. Instead you can try enum for representing the string and use it in the switch case block like

enum MyString(raj,taj,aaj);

Use it int the swich case statement.

share|improve this answer

Switches only work with integral types (int, char, bool, etc.). Why not use a map to pair a string with a number and then use that number with the switch?

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    cout << "\nEnter word to select your choice\n"; 
    cout << "ex to exit program (0)\n";     
    cout << "m     to set month(1)\n";
    cout << "y     to set year(2)\n";
    cout << "rm     to return the month(4)\n";
    cout << "ry     to return year(5)\n";
    cout << "pc     to print the calendar for a month(6)\n";
    cout << "fdc      to print the first day of the month(1)\n";
    cin >> c;
    cout << endl;
    a = c.compare("ex") ?c.compare("m") ?c.compare("y") ? c.compare("rm")?c.compare("ry") ? c.compare("pc") ? c.compare("fdc") ? 7 : 6 :  5  : 4 : 3 : 2 : 1 : 0;
    switch (a)
    {
        case 0:
            return 1;

        case 1:                   ///m
        {
            cout << "enter month\n";
            cin >> c;
            cout << endl;
            myCalendar.setMonth(c);
            break;
        }
        case 2:
            cout << "Enter year(yyyy)\n";
            cin >> y;
            cout << endl;
            myCalendar.setYear(y);
            break;
        case 3:
             myCalendar.getMonth();
            break;
        case 4:
            myCalendar.getYear();
        case 5:
            cout << "Enter month and year\n";
            cin >> c >> y;
            cout << endl;
            myCalendar.almanaq(c,y);
            break;
        case 6:
            break;

    }
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2  
While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how this code answers the question improves its long-term value. – Benjamin W. Mar 9 at 3:25

That's because C++ turns switches into jump tables. It performs a trivial operation on the input data and jumps to the proper address without comparing. Since a string is not a number, but an array of numbers, C++ cannot create a jump table from it.

movf    INDEX,W     ; move the index value into the W (working) register from memory
addwf   PCL,F       ; add it to the program counter. each PIC instruction is one byte
                    ; so there is no need to perform any multiplication. 
                    ; Most architectures will transform the index in some way before 
                    ; adding it to the program counter

table                   ; the branch table begins here with this label
    goto    index_zero  ; each of these goto instructions is an unconditional branch
    goto    index_one   ; of code
    goto    index_two
    goto    index_three

index_zero
    ; code is added here to perform whatever action is required when INDEX = zero
    return

index_one
...

(code from wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branch_table)

share|improve this answer

To add a variation using the simplest container possible (no need for an ordered map)... I wouldn't bother with an enum--just put the container definition immediately before the switch so it'll be easy to see which number represents which case.

This does a hashed lookup in the unordered_map and uses the associated int to drive the switch statement. Should be quite fast. Note that at is used instead of [], as I've made that contained const. Using [] can be dangerous--if the string isn't in the map, you'll create a new mapping and may end up with undefined results or a continuously growing map.

Note that the at() function will throw an exception if the string isn't in the map. So you may want to test first using count().

const static std::unordered_map<std::string,int> string_to_case{
   {"raj",1},
   {"ben",2}
};
switch(string_to_case.at("raj")) {
  case 1: // this is the "raj" case
       break;
  case 2: // this is the "ben" case
       break;


}

The version with a test for an undefined string follows:

const static std::unordered_map<std::string,int> string_to_case{
   {"raj",1},
   {"ben",2}
};
switch(string_to_case.count("raj") ? string_to_case.at("raj") : 0) {
  case 1: // this is the "raj" case
       break;
  case 2: // this is the "ben" case
       break;
  case 0: //this is for the undefined case

}
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