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I am working to develop a C++ machine learning library for some of my own work, and I was curious about best practices for representing input data. Right now, I am thinking about using an DataManager class that handles the I/O operations for reading the data in from file, from a stream, etc. In developing this, I realized that it was also necessary to create classes to manage feature labels (to associate with the input data) and class labels (in the case of training data).

Therefore, my implementation has a class that reads data from a file (I'm using the UCI machine learning repository) into a boost::variant object. The DataManager class overloads operator>> so that I can read each comma-delimited feature value from the line supplied; it the feature value is '?', it inputs struct t_missing {}.

For the class/feature managers, I am thinking that maintaining a linked list of feature/class names and the number of instances falling within each would be appropriate.

Anyway, this was just my initial thought on such a class, and I would love to hear some other thoughts/suggestions on the implementation. Showing code is not necessary; I'm mostly just interested in hearing about other things I should perhaps consider.

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

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Some learning problems are on sparse data, that is data with a large number of possible features most of which are zero. In this case it is much more efficient to only store features which are non-zero.

This is usually the case with SVM libraries, such as LibSVM, which stores vectors as a list of (feature_index, feature_value) pairs. E.g. The format they would use for a vector:

 [0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1]

would be: (indexes start from 1)

 2:1 5:1 8:1
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