Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two classes, which are passed to Serialization method and I would like to access two properties of these classes in Serialization method. The problem is that Serialization method parameter are passed as generic type and I do not know how to access properties of passed class in this case. The example below.

    public class MyClass1 
    {

            public string MyProperty1 { get; set; }

            //These properties are shared in both classes
            public bool Result { get; set; }
            public string EngineErrorMessage { get; set; }

    }
    public class MyClass2 
    {

            public string MyProperty2 { get; set; }

            //These properties are shared in both classes
            public bool Result { get; set; }
            public string EngineErrorMessage { get; set; }

    }


//The method is used to serialize classes above, classes are passed as generic types
    public void Serialization<T>(ref T engine)
            {
                try
                {
                 //Do some work with passed class
                 }
                catch (Exception e)
                {

                   //If Exception occurs I would like to write values to passed class properties, how to do that?
                   Result = false;
                   EngineErrorMessage = e.Message;
                }
    }

Full method code

     public void Submit<T>(ref T engine)
        {
            try
            {

                var workingDir = Path.Combine(Settings.FileStoragePath, Helpers.GetRandomInt(9).ToString());



                Directory.CreateDirectory(workingDir);
                var inputFile = Path.Combine(workingDir, Settings.InFileName);
                var outputFile = Path.Combine(workingDir, Settings.OutFileName);
                var deleteFile = Path.Combine(workingDir, Settings.DelFileName);

                try
                {



                    using (var stream = new FileStream(inputFile, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.None))
                    {
                        Serializer.Serialize(stream, engine);
                    }


                    CheckStatus(outputFile);


                    using (var stream = new FileStream(outputFile, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None))
                    {
                        engine = Serializer.Deserialize<T>(stream);                        
                    }


                }
                finally
                {
                    File.Create(deleteFile).Dispose();
                }
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                //ToDo: Not implemented yet.
/*               Result = false;
               ErrorMessage = e.Message;*/
            }
        }
share|improve this question
    
Btw, it seems very unlikely that you would need ref on a method that serializes a class... is there a specific reason for this? –  Marc Gravell Jun 28 '11 at 7:11
    
I am new to C# and use your serialization library, I use serialization and desiarialiaztion in one method. The code above is not the whole. So to desializate and return values back to class I pass it as ref. Also if I will not pass class as reference I will not be able to assign Result and EngineErrorMessage properties of these classes. Right? –  Tomas Jun 28 '11 at 7:17
    
@Tomas even without the ref you are still passing a reference to the instance (since it is a class), so .Result and EngineErrorMessage will still work fine; the real question is whether you need to assign a new object to the parameter and have the caller notice the reassignment. However, in most cases it would be preferable to return such a value, for example void Serialize(T) and T Deserialize(). –  Marc Gravell Jun 28 '11 at 7:20
    
@Marc I have posted full method code, as you see I am not only serialize class but also desiarialize it. If I remove REF the code below will not work. Right? engine = Serializer.Deserialize<T>(stream); –  Tomas Jun 28 '11 at 7:27
    
@Tomas: Yes, this will not work without ref. As Marc said just return engine. –  Florian Greinacher Jun 28 '11 at 7:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Declare an interface containing the properties Result and EngineErrorMessage. Now you have two options:

  1. Add a constraint to your serialization type parameter so that only types that derive from the interface mentioned above can be serialized, or
  2. In your catch block try to cast engine to the interface mentioned above. If the cast succeeds, write the propertie values, otherwise do nothing.

Sample:

public interface ISerializationErrorWriter
{
    bool Result { set; get; }
    string EngineErrorMessage { set; get; }
}

public class MyClass1 : ISerializationErrorWriter
{
    public string MyProperty1 { get; set; }

    public bool Result { get; set; }
    public string EngineErrorMessage { get; set; }
}

public class MyClass2 : ISerializationErrorWriter
{
    public string MyProperty2 { get; set; }

    public bool Result { get; set; }
    public string EngineErrorMessage { get; set; }
}

// Option 1:
public void Serialization_1<T>(ref T engine) where T : ISerializationErrorWriter
{
    try
    {
        //Do some work with passed class
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        engine.Result = false;
        engine.EngineErrorMessage = e.Message;
    }
}

// Option 2:
public void Serialization_2<T>(ref T engine)
{
    try
    {
        //Do some work with passed class
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        var serializationErrorWriter = engine as ISerializationErrorWriter;
        if(serializationErrorWriter != null)
        {
            serializationErrorWriter.Result = false;
            serializationErrorWriter.EngineErrorMessage = e.Message;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't make much difference here, but one of the properties was MyProperty1, not 2 –  Marc Gravell Jun 28 '11 at 7:35
    
You're so right. I don't copy & paste code usually :) –  Florian Greinacher Jun 28 '11 at 7:37
    
It would have mattered more if you had used the property in ISerializationErrorWriter, but you didn't - so all is good. –  Marc Gravell Jun 28 '11 at 7:39

You will have to use reflection at some point, via typeof(T) (or maybe engine.GetType()). If this is a frequent code-path you may want to cache some kind of strategy per-type to avoid overhead. Or perhaps better: use a pre-built serialization API that optimises for this type of scenario (i.e. most of them).

If you mean the Result and EngineErrorMessage, then 2 options:

  1. put those two properties on an interface, implement that interface from the t 2 types, and add the where T : ISomeInterface constraint to Serialization<T>
  2. use dynamic to duck-type to the properties
share|improve this answer

If you have only two classes to deal with I think following serialization code can server you well

//The method is used to serialize classes above, classes are passed as generic types
                public void Serialization<T>(ref T engine)
                {
                    try
                    {
                        Type genericType = typeof(T);

                        if (typeof(MyClass1).Equals(genericType))
                        {
                            MyClass1 engineClass1 = engine as MyClass1;
                            //DO something for class 1
                        }
                        else if (typeof(MyClass2).Equals(genericType))
                        {
                            MyClass2 engineClass2 = engine as MyClass2;
                            //DO something for class 2
                        }

                    }
                    catch (Exception e)
                    {
                        //If Exception occurs I would like to write values to passed class properties, how to do that?
                        Result = false;
                        EngineErrorMessage = e.Message;
                    }
                }
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, but this does not answer the question. The OP wanted to know how to write the properties Result and EngineErrorMessage in the catch block. –  Florian Greinacher Jun 28 '11 at 7:33
    
ohk.. sorry.. I misunderstood the question. –  Sumit Jun 28 '11 at 8:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.