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Is there a big performace difference between these 2 sample method calls ?

SampleClass sc = new SampleLib.SampleClass();
sc.DoSomething("Hello");

dynamic dyn = someAssembly.CreateInstance("SampleLib.SampleClass")
dyn.DoSomething("Hello");

Lets assume that

dynamic dyn = someAssembly.CreateInstance("SampleLib.SampleClass")

is not frequent call. Once it creates the instance it will continue intensivly work only with created instance.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The only way to know for sure is to profile in your context. To set expectation, dynamic is pretty smart, and caches (per pattern) the actual code-path. As such, it is much faster than raw reflection, however an interface should be slightly faster and has the advantage of static checking.

Personally, I'd code to an interface from a library dll that both the current code and SampleLib can reference, i.e.

IMyInterface foo = (IMyInterface)someAssembly.CreateInstance(
                         "SampleLib.SampleClass");
...
foo.DoSomething("Hello");
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You mean that here we will not have any performance difference as foo.DoSomething("Hello"); will be called staticly ? no dinamic binding overhead ? –  NDeveloper Jun 28 '11 at 7:10
    
@NDeveloper minimal overhead. It still has to check the cache of signatures it has seen before. The point is: it isn't stupidly slow. It isn't quite as fast as static typing either. –  Marc Gravell Jun 28 '11 at 7:16
    
@Marc Sorry what means to check the cache of signatures ? Where can I read more about this? –  NDeveloper Jun 28 '11 at 9:15
    
@NDeveloper what I mean is, it needs to check that dyn (the target) is of a type it has seen before, and that it has seen a call with those exact parameters (always a single string in your case, but trickier in the general case). So really: has it seen SimpleClass before? if so, it should be quick. If not, it needs to (still pretty quick) figure out how to call that, and cache it. –  Marc Gravell Jun 28 '11 at 9:18
    
@Mark I see, thank you very much for more details. Do I get right that in the code from your answer no need for such behavior as the call is performed statically. –  NDeveloper Jun 28 '11 at 9:35

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