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I am a total FORTRAN 77 newbie, and I don't understand why the first code shows an error while the second one compiles when I expect them to do the same.

First code (which doesn't compile and gives a error citing an unexpected data declaration statement at z):

program FOO

integer x, y

x = 1
y = 2

integer z 

z = 3

end

This code which looks 100% similar in functionality to the first one compiles without errors

program FOO

integer x, y, z

x = 1
y = 2
z = 3

end

I also tried disabling implicit variable declarations in the first code with no effects.

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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Fortran is one of those quaint "define everything at the top" languages. In other words, this would be fine:

program FOO
    integer x, y
    integer z 
    x = 1
    y = 2
    z = 3
end

since all type specifications are before any executable code. If you're going to define a variable, you should define it first. See here for example:

Such non-executable statements must be placed at the beginning of a program, before the first executable statement.

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yeah, even I guessed that. But if that's the case, then its vital information and should be in the FORTRAN books. But I couldn't find a single reference to this. –  Bernhard Heijstek Jun 28 '11 at 8:20
    
This is correct. Executable statements must be after all variable declarations. –  Zéychin Jun 28 '11 at 8:21
    
It does seem a rather important aspect, doesn't it? Added a link to a tutorial which suggests this is the case but I guess the ANSI standards docs would be the best. I have the ISO C ones since I've done a bit of work on compilers for that, but I can't really justify the cost of the Fortran ones since no-one will pay me for such a beast :-) –  paxdiablo Jun 28 '11 at 8:25
3  
@phycker: If your fortran books were half decent, they would contain this info; if they don't, I would ditch them and find others. @paxdiablo: Although the official standard documents aren't free, the final draft (which is the one that gets voted on by the committee) is freely available. The gfortran wiki has a page with links to them: gcc.gnu.org/wiki/GFortranStandards. –  eriktous Jun 28 '11 at 14:32
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I don't know real solution but maybe fortran77 doesn't support any code between variables.

for example;

integer x, y, z

x = 1
y = 2
z = 3

works but

integer x, y

x = 1
y = 2

integer z 

z = 3

doesn't work. Because between two integer definening (integer x, y and integer z ), there are variables assigning.

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@paxdiablo: you think right!

and the errormessage:

"... unexpected data declaration statement at ..."

all DELCARATION must be made BEFORE the first STATEMENT occurs. fortran77 is really "old", I´m not shure if this is changed in F95

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I know it's not changed in Fortran90 and am fairly certain it is not changed if Fortran95. It is best practice to declare variables at the top of a function/subroutine/program, anyway. –  Zéychin Jun 28 '11 at 8:34
1  
The same rule is still in effect as of the latest version of the standard, Fortran 2008. –  janneb Jun 28 '11 at 8:42
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For your information: Disabling implicit variable declarations simply removes Fortan's ability to make assumptions about what type your variables are.

Implicit variable declaration makes the following assumptions: Any variable beginning with (capital or lowercase): I, J, K, L, M, or N is to be INTEGER. Any variable beginning with any other letter (capital or lowercase) is to be REAL. This applies only to variables which do not have an explicit type declaration.

You could write:

program FOO
ijk
ifjkask    
end

and ijk and ifjkask would be INTEGER values.

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