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my text file "testnum" looks like this:

xxx1abc
xxx2abc
xxx3abc
xxx4abc
xxx5abc
xxx6abc
xxx7abc
xxx8abc
xxx9abc
xxx10abc..etc

this gives my desired output in cmdline

for n in {1..10}
do
o=`sed -n "${n}p" < testnum`
clear
echo -e "you read ${o}\r"
grep  -n -C 2 ${o} testnum 
sleep 2s
done

and that looks like this which is what i want

you read xxx10abc
8-xxx8abc
9-xxx9abc
10:xxx10abc
11-xxx11abc
12-xxx12abc

just that it clears the cmd line everytime it iterates what i want is this

nikola@nikola-desktop:~/Downloads$bash my_skirpt
you read xxx1abc
1:xxx1abc
2-xxx2abc
3-xxx3abc

last iteration should be

nikola@nikola-desktop:~/Downloads$bash my_skirpt
    you read xxx10abc
    8-xxx8abc
    9-xxx9abc
    10:xxx10abc
    11-xxx11abc
    12-xxx12abc
nikola@nikola-desktop:~/Downloads$
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3  
I don't get what you mean... –  Bobby Jun 28 '11 at 8:58
    
i want to have echo and grep replaced each time for-loop changes n, not a new output n changes –  nkvnkv Jun 28 '11 at 9:33
    
Sorry, still cannot figure it out. You want to run my_skirpt multiple times and have that cause the n to advance? So the first time you run the program it returns the first line, and the second time you run the program it returns the second line, etc? –  Seth Robertson Jun 28 '11 at 20:38
    
I too am having problems understanding exactly what you mean. –  Kev Jun 28 '11 at 20:54
    
I think I understood. You want the script not to clear the command line but "replace" the actual text on each iteration. –  Lynch Jun 29 '11 at 4:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not entirely certain, but I think you want it to overwrite all the lines it printed the last iteration? In that case, you want to use tput:

#!/bin/bash
tput sc
for n in {1..10}
do
o=`sed -n "${n}p" < testnum.txt`
echo -e "you read ${o}\r"
grep  -n -C 2 ${o} testnum.txt
sleep 2s
tput rc
tput el1
done;
tput sc

tput sc saves the current cursor position, so we can later recall this position with tput rc. tput el1 clears the line we're on so that the changing number of lines (first and last outputs are shorter than the other ones) doesn't destroy anything.

There is a lot more you can do with tput, google will for instance give you this page, which I find quite good.

share|improve this answer
    
yes yes yes thats it –  nkvnkv Jun 29 '11 at 8:20
    
Good! Glad I could help :) –  carlpett Jun 29 '11 at 8:24

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