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public class A{

  int i;

  public int getI(){
    return i;
  }

  public void setI(int i){
    this.i = i;
  }

}

how to make it threadsafe? always counters are the example Thanks Naveen

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closed as not a real question by Cody Gray, Mitch Wheat, Prince John Wesley, Bombe, Petar Minchev Jun 28 '11 at 10:40

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Looks like a homework? –  Ozair Kafray Jun 28 '11 at 10:21
    
You want to use 'synchronized', as per one of the answers. –  Charles Goodwin Jun 28 '11 at 12:11

4 Answers 4

public class A{

final AtomicInteger ai = new AtomicInteger();

public int getI(){ return ai.get(); }

public void setI(int i){ ai.set(i); }

}
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I would assign ai and make it final. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 28 '11 at 10:22
    
It might be a good idea to instantiate ai somewhere. –  Zéychin Jun 28 '11 at 10:30
    
thanks Peter yep sorry should of been more careful –  Paul Whelan Jun 28 '11 at 10:31
    
Not sure why it was down voted though so +1. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 28 '11 at 10:36

You can make i volatile.

However if you want to implement a counter I suggest you use an AtomicInteger instead.

public class Counter {
    private final AtomicInteger i = new AtomicInteger();
    public int getI() { return i.get(); }
    public void setI(int i) { this.i.set(i); }
    public int incrementAndGetI() { return i.incrementAndGet(); }
}
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Not sure what the problem is, that's what AtomicInteger does. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 28 '11 at 10:23
    
You are returning a value from a void method for setI. –  Paul Whelan Jun 28 '11 at 10:30
    
@Paul, cheers. My built-in compiler is buggy. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Jun 28 '11 at 10:35
3  
:) I have the exact same compiler running here ;) –  Paul Whelan Jun 28 '11 at 10:35
public class A
{
    int i;
    public synchronized int getI()
    {
        return i;
    }

    public synchronized void setI(int i)
    {
        this.i = i;
    }

}

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You can use a ReentrantLock

ReentrantLock rl = new ReentrantLock();

and inside get/set

try{
    rl.lock();
    //use the variable
}finally{
    rl.unlock();
}

or make the variable volatile

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The question here is if you create an object of this class and call setter and getter from 5 threads without using volatile or mark it as Atomic Integer, will it be thread safe, if not why? –  naveen gupta Jun 28 '11 at 14:08

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