Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
var DEST_VALUE = 1
var APPDAYS_AFTER = 2

}

How can i check whether the variable holds some value or not. When i do this, it does not work...

share|improve this question
    
This will work as expected - neither if condition will evaluate to true so the inner code will never be hit. What are you trying to achieve? –  Chris Francis Jun 28 '11 at 10:37
    
if(!DEST_VALUE) is same as if(DEST_VALUE == null), and from the code this will always be false. So it will not produce any result. –  Talha Ahmed Khan Jun 28 '11 at 10:40
    
possible duplicate of How can I test whether a variable has a value in JavaScript? –  Felix Kling Jun 28 '11 at 10:42
1  
@Talha Not strictly true - if DEST_VALUE was 0 it would also evaluate to true. –  Chris Francis Jun 28 '11 at 10:43
1  
@Talha: "if(!DEST_VALUE) is same as if(DEST_VALUE == null)" No, it doesn't. For instance, !0 is true but 0 == null is false. More to the point, though, if (!DEST_VALUE) has nothing to do with null unless DEST_VALUE happens to be null (in which case, the expression is true). It's about coercing the given value to a boolean, not comparing it to null. –  T.J. Crowder Jun 28 '11 at 10:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Of course it doesn't do anything, because in your example DEST_VALUE resolves to true like APPDAYS_AFTER. Value that resolve to false when converted to a boolean in javascript are:

false
null
undefined
The empty string ''
The number 0
The number NaN (yep, 'Not a Number' is a number, it is a special number)

if you write

if(!DEST_VALUE){
    txtSiteId.value = fileContents.Settings.SiteID;
}

you write "if DEST_VALUE is not true do something" (in your case it does nothing). If you want to check if a variables hold a value:

if(DEST_VALUE !== undefined){
     //do something
}
share|improve this answer
    
This will throw an ReferenceError as you may not reference variables that are not declared in JS. See my answer for a solution. –  Steffen Müller Jun 28 '11 at 10:43
1  
@Steffen: The question clearly shows the variables being declared. –  T.J. Crowder Jun 28 '11 at 10:47
    
But what about FileNotFound??? thedailywtf.com/Articles/What_Is_Truth_0x3f_.aspx –  cwallenpoole Jun 28 '11 at 10:52

I use such function to check if variable is empty or not:

function empty( mixed_var ) {
    return ( typeof(mixed_var) === 'undefined' || mixed_var === "" || mixed_var === 0   || mixed_var === "0" || mixed_var === null  || mixed_var === false );
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Why would you do all this? !myVar checks for 'falsy' values, not just explicit false (such as myVar === false), so you don't need a bloated function to do the same as the native language capabilities. –  Chris Francis Jun 28 '11 at 10:39
1  
By the way, a string representation of "0" shouldn't evaluate to false, only an empty string... –  Chris Francis Jun 28 '11 at 10:40
    
@Chris: Well, it's his function, he can do that if it matches his definition of "empty". It doesn't match mine, but... :-) –  T.J. Crowder Jun 28 '11 at 10:48
    
Yes - that function was changed several times and you can see the final result. Why !myVar is not used - because all is not so simple. I had some issues when it worked not as I expected too. –  Andron Jun 29 '11 at 21:33

I assume you mean "holds some value" like in "the variable has been created so it exists", right? Otherwise, your approach works perfectly fine.

If you want to check whether a variable exists in javascript, you have to check its parent object for the property - otherwise the script will fail. Each object in javascript belongs to a parent object, even if it seems to be global (then, it belongs to the window object). So, try something like:

  if (window.DEST_VALUE) 
    // do something
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.