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Is it possible in C++ to write a function that returns a pointer to itself?

If no, suggest some other solution to make the following syntax work:

some_type f ()
{
    static int cnt = 1;
    std::cout << cnt++ << std::endl;
}
int main ()
{
    f()()()...(); // n calls
}

This must print all the numbers from 1 to n.

share|improve this question
4  
@DumbCoder: the question was about to make the syntax work, not about how to print n numbers using the same function –  Grigor Gevorgyan Jun 28 '11 at 11:14
1  
possible duplicate of Function pointer pointing to a function that takes a function pointer... –  Xeo Jun 28 '11 at 11:16
2  
@San: I don't think the question is idiotic (and I think you could have chosen a better word anyway to express the same idea). It's a curiosity question. And if one is curious to know some dirty language corners, it doesn't mean he wants to use them in production code –  Armen Tsirunyan Jun 28 '11 at 11:31
3  
@San, I find this a very interesting question, taking me back to my grad-school days in computer science. Consider the identity function I := λx.x in untyped lambda calculus. It returns whatever you give it. Pass it itself (I I), and it returns itself, which is what this question asks for. It's impossible to define in simply typed lambda calculus because we cannot express the required types. Imagine C++: template<class X> X I(X x){return x;}. There's no value of T to make I(I<T>) valid. That's a problem calling for creative, constructive input. Ignore it if you wish. –  Rob Kennedy Jun 28 '11 at 14:55
4  
Incidentally, it is quite easy to do this in C#: class C { delegate D D(); static D M(){ return M; } }. Or, the traditional way to do this in functional languages is to define a combinator that takes and returns its own type: class C { delegate D D(D d); static D M(D d){ return M; } } –  Eric Lippert Jun 28 '11 at 15:58
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4 Answers 4

up vote 24 down vote accepted
struct function
{
   function operator () ()
   { 
       //do stuff;
       return function();
   }
};

int main()
{
   function f;
   f()()()()()();
}

You can choose to return a reference to function if needed and return *this;

Update: Of course, it is syntactically impossible for a function of type T to return T* or T&

Update2:

Of course, if you want one to preserve your syntax... that is

some_type f()
{
}

Then here's an Idea

struct functor;
functor f();
struct functor
{
   functor operator()()
   {
      return f();
   }
};

functor f()
{  
    return functor();
}

int main()
{
    f()()()()();
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Armen: +1. You could simply do this : return *this; No need to create another functor! –  Nawaz Jun 28 '11 at 11:14
    
@Nawaz: Yup, I agree –  Armen Tsirunyan Jun 28 '11 at 11:14
    
Just so i understand *this resolves to teh function address if in a function & an object address if in member function ? –  Ricko M Jun 28 '11 at 11:16
    
Nice workaround :) doesn't really answer the question though.. –  Karoly Horvath Jun 28 '11 at 11:16
    
@Armen: Not only return *this;, its also better to return it as reference as : function & operator () () –  Nawaz Jun 28 '11 at 11:19
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No, you can't, because the return type has to include the return type of the function, which is recursive. You can of course return function objects or something like that which can do this.

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We can. Using function objects. –  iammilind Jun 28 '11 at 11:21
11  
@iammilind: I think that I might have explicitly mentioned that you can use function objects? –  Puppy Jun 28 '11 at 11:28
add comment

You can use pattern of function objects:

struct f
{
  f& operator () ()
  {
    static int cnt = 1;
    cout<<cnt++<<endl;
    return *this;
  }
};

Just you need to put one extra (). Usage:

f()()()(); //prints 1,2,3

Here is the demo.

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add comment

Of course it is possible, just look the following code:


#include <stdio.h>

typedef void * (*func)();

void * test()
{
    printf("this is test\n");
    return (void *)&test;
}

int main()
{
    (*(func)test())();
}

The result is :


user@linux:~/work/test> gcc test_func.cc -o test          
user@linux:~/work/test> ./test
this is test
this is test
share|improve this answer
3  
Very very ugly solution. If you want to call it third time, if you've to do this : ((*func)(*(func)test())())(); –  Nawaz Jun 28 '11 at 11:16
    
NOT PORTABLE!!! –  Armen Tsirunyan Jun 28 '11 at 11:17
2  
It is not guaranteed by the standard that a function pointer can safely be converted to void * –  Armen Tsirunyan Jun 28 '11 at 11:17
    
It's just a way to show that it can do that, although it's not a good implementation. –  小武哥 Jun 28 '11 at 11:19
1  
@James Kanze: POSIX offered incompatible guarantees. In ISO C++98, it was an error, diagnostic required; in POSIX it was well-defined behavior. Under the "conditionally supported behavior" rule, it's either implementation-defined behavior or an error (diagnostic required). I.e. POSIX implementations can refer to POSIX standard; implementations where it's impossible must still give an error. –  MSalters Jun 28 '11 at 12:58
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