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I've tried googling for a solution to this problem but haven't yet found one.

Given a working directory named '/project', I'm trying to find a way of telling if git has ever in the history of the repository tracked a file named '/project/x/y/fubar'.

Is this possible? It seems like the kind of thing that should have an answer already but my google-Fu is failing me this morning.

Edit: possible duplicate at git - how to tell if a file is git tracked (by shell exit code)?

I don't consider that question the same as this one because the file I'm trying to get information on is not guaranteed to be currently tracked by git, and may not exist in the working dir at calling time. The answers to that question all seem to tell you if the file is currently being tracked by git. Please tell me if I'm wrong and one of those solutions is acceptable for my goal.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Simplest would be git log --all -- x/y/fubar - if the file was there, it would have give atleast one log entry.

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And just pipe it into wc -l and check for the return value. –  pmr Jun 28 '11 at 12:38
    
To pipe to wc, you would need to add --oneline to the git log command. Also, if you you are piping output from the log command add no pager to git: git --no-pager log ... –  Adam Dymitruk Jun 28 '11 at 15:45

A nicer approach would be:

git log --all --pretty=format: --name-only --diff-filter=A | sort - | grep fubar

Merged from a couple of other answers.

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Here is two useful alias: FindFile ff and FindFilewithCopies ffc:

# Find if one file ever had into repository
ff = "!git log --pretty=format: --name-status --all -M -B | sort -u | grep $1   #"
# The same as above but showing copied files
ffc = "!git log --pretty=format: --name-status --all -C -M -B | sort -u | grep $1 #"

You get information about file names and operations with them.

Sample use:

$ git ff create
A       database/migrations/2014_10_12_000000_create_users_table.php
A       database/migrations/2014_10_12_100000_create_password_resets_table.php
A       database/migrations/2015_05_11_200932_create_boletin_table.php
A       database/migrations/2015_05_15_133500_create_usuarios_table.php
D       database/migrations/2015_05_12_000000_create_users_table.php
M       database/migrations/2015_05_11_200932_create_boletin_table.php
R051    database/migrations/2014_10_12_000000_create_users_table.php    database/migrations/2015_05_12_000000_create_users_table.php

$ git ffc create
A       database/migrations/2014_10_12_000000_create_users_table.php
A       database/migrations/2014_10_12_100000_create_password_resets_table.php
A       database/migrations/2015_05_11_200932_create_boletin_table.php
A       database/migrations/2015_05_15_133500_create_usuarios_table.php
C052    database/migrations/2014_10_12_000000_create_users_table.php    database/migrations/2015_05_11_210246_create_boletin_nosend_table.php
D       database/migrations/2015_05_12_000000_create_users_table.php
M       database/migrations/2015_05_11_200932_create_boletin_table.php
R051    database/migrations/2014_10_12_000000_create_users_table.php    database/migrations/2015_05_12_000000_create_users_table.php

(Posible duplicated from: List all the files that ever existed in a Git repository)

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