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my ($INV_NB, $USAGE)=split /\|/,"9998|999999999999999";

if ($USAGE=~/^\d{15}\b/)
{
  print "\nUSAGE is Valid\n";
  print "length of $USAGE is ",length($USAGE);  
}

This worked as expected, but how can I negate this regexp? say if usage is not /^\d{15}\b/

if ($USAGE!=~/^\d{15}\b/)
{
  print "\nUSAGE is Invalid\n";
  print "length of $USAGE is ",length($USAGE);  
}

I tried this, but it isnt working ..

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Using tabs in code is taboo. –  user142019 Jun 28 '11 at 11:23
    
There's unless (EXPR) BLOCK too, which may make the meaning more obvious. –  Mike Jun 28 '11 at 11:40
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can do:

if ($USAGE !~ /^\d{15}\b/)

Perl documentation:

Binary "!~" is just like "=~" except the return value is negated in the logical sense.

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1  
Or you can do unless ($USAGE=~/^\d{15}\b/) or if (not $USAGE=~/^\d{15}\b/) –  Francisco R Jun 28 '11 at 11:39
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The other answers are correct, but if you ever want to negate a regex (and not the operator that applies it), you can use

/^(?!.*?$regex_to_be_negated)/s
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Also:

unless ($USAGE=~/^\d{15}\b/)
{
  print "\nUSAGE is Invalid\n";
  print "length of $USAGE is ",length($USAGE);  
}
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