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I'm trying to modify the 'attr' function in the jQuery (V.6.1) core.

I have a plugins.js file that's included in the page after the jquery-6.1.js file. The plugins.js file contains improvments made to various jQuery core functions to accomodate some SVG functionality.

I've copied the attr function into the plugins.js file without modifying it, but it now produces a JavaScript error when it's called.

Does anyone know why this particular function doesn't like to be overwritten (I'm probably overwriting it in the wrong fashion):

(function($){

    $.fn.attr = function( elem, name, value, pass ){

        var nType = elem.nodeType;

        // don't get/set attributes on text, comment and attribute nodes
        if ( !elem || nType === 3 || nType === 8 || nType === 2 ) {
            return undefined;
        }

        if ( pass && name in jQuery.attrFn ) {
            return jQuery( elem )[ name ]( value );
        }

        // Fallback to prop when attributes are not supported
        if ( !("getAttribute" in elem) ) {
            return jQuery.prop( elem, name, value );
        }

        var ret, hooks,
            notxml = nType !== 1 || !jQuery.isXMLDoc( elem );

        // Normalize the name if needed
        name = notxml && jQuery.attrFix[ name ] || name;

        hooks = jQuery.attrHooks[ name ];

        if ( !hooks ) {

            // Use boolHook for boolean attributes
            if ( rboolean.test( name ) &&
                (typeof value === "boolean" || value === undefined || value.toLowerCase() === name.toLowerCase()) ) {
                hooks = boolHook;

            // Use formHook for forms and if the name contains certain characters
            } else if ( formHook && (jQuery.nodeName( elem, "form" ) || rinvalidChar.test( name )) ) {
                hooks = formHook;
            }

        }

        if ( value !== undefined ) {

            if ( value === null ) {
                jQuery.removeAttr( elem, name );
                return undefined;

            } else if ( hooks && "set" in hooks && notxml && (ret = hooks.set( elem, value, name )) !== undefined ) {
                return ret;

            } else {
                elem.setAttribute( name, "" + value );
                return value;
            }

        } else if ( hooks && "get" in hooks && notxml ) {

            return hooks.get( elem, name );

        } else {

            ret = elem.getAttribute( name );

            // Non-existent attributes return null, we normalize to undefined
            return ret === null ?
                undefined :
                ret;
        }

    };

})(jQuery);
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2  
What error does it produce? –  Jack Franklin Jun 28 '11 at 12:09
1  
what types of elements are you using attr on? in jquery 1.6 they changed exclusivly how attr works, you now use prop on certain html elements like DIV tags, and tables to set properties: api.jquery.com/prop –  John Jun 28 '11 at 12:17
    
Invalid 'in' operand elem - if ( !("getAttribute" in elem) ) { Incidentially, I've used this technique before to modify parts of jQuery, it just seems to be the attr function (so far) that doesn't accept the overwrite. –  Steve Jun 28 '11 at 12:18
    
I'm modifying the attr function to accommodate SVG's 'transform' attribute. –  Steve Jun 28 '11 at 12:20
    
i feel like i remember reading something from jquery.com that said not to modify the core, but rather extend. is that a possibility for what you're doing? –  AndyL Jun 30 '11 at 19:57
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead of completely overwriting the base attr function, just extend it like this:

(function($){
    var jqAttr = $.fn.attr;
    $.fn.attr = function( elem, name, value, pass ) {
        // check to see if it's the special case you're looking for
        if (name === 'transform') {
            // handle your special SVG case here
        } else {
            jqAttr(elem, name, value, pass);
        }
    };
}(jQuery));

I did something similar to this to override $.each to provide some custom functionality. I'm not sure if this will fix the bug you're having, but it is a better way to add a minor custom change in functionality instead of having to copy/paste the entire method to make one change. This method also allows the base jQuery library to change without affecting your customization.

share|improve this answer
    
I like it. Thanks for the good tip. –  Steve Jul 1 '11 at 8:10
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