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The codeproject.com showcase Part 2: OpenCL™ – Memory Spaces states that Global memory should be considered as streaming memory [...] and that the best performance will be achieved when streaming contiguous memory addresses or memory access patterns that can exploit the full bandwidth of the memory subsystem.

My understanding of this sentence is, that for optimal performance one should constantly fill and read global memory while the GPU is working on the kernels. But I have no idea, how I would implement such an concept and I am not able to recognize it in the (rather simple) examples and tutorials I've read.

Do know a good example or can link to one?

Bonus question: Is this analog in the CUDA framework?

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2 Answers 2

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My understanding of this sentence is, that for optimal performance one should constantly fill and read global memory while the GPU is working on the kernels

That isn't really a correct interpretation.

Typical OpenCL devices (ie. GPUs) have extremely high bandwidth, high latency global memory systems. This sort of memory system is highly optimized for access to contiguous or linear memory access. What that piece you quote is really saying is that OpenCL kernels should be designed to access global memory in the sort of contiguous fashion which is optimal for GPU memory. NVIDIA call this sort of optimal, contiguous memory access "coalesced", and discuss memory access pattern optimization for their hardware in some detail in both their CUDA and OpenCL guides.

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I agree with talonmies about his interpretation of that guideline: sequential memory access are fastest. It's pretty obvious (to any OpenCL-capable developer) that sequential memory accesses are the fastest though, so it's funny that NVidia explicitly spells it out like that.

Your interpretation, although not what that document is saying, is also correct. If your algorithm allows it, it is best to upload in reasonably sized chunks asynchronously so it can get started on the compute sooner, overlapping compute with DMA transfers to/from system RAM.

It is also helpful to have more than one wavefront/warp, so the device can interleave them to hide memory latency. Good GPUs are heavily optimized to be able to do this switching extremely fast to stay busy while blocked on memory.

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+1 thanks for the input –  Framester Mar 14 '12 at 10:58

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