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I recently spent many hours trying to fix a problematic ld script. Once I had drawn (on paper) all the different sections I could figure out the problem.

So I started searching for some sort of LD script generator, but could not find any! Does anybody know if such a tool exist? Something that can import/export ld scripts or map-file/elf-file and show the different objects/sections and the addresses?

I know there are some IDEs out there where you do not need to worry about LD-scripts but I am using eclipse and it does not even offer syntax highlighting!

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There is such a tool in the Green Hills MULTI toolset, which is proprietary. I have not seen such a tool elsewhere. That said, I've never found it to be useful either for display or editing. Dumping the sections boundaries from the executable with readelf and rolling your own graph would probably be a quick job, though. Your note about 'some IDEs' makes me question what exactly you're doing with the linker script, though... – djs Jun 30 '11 at 7:53
    
Yes, what you suggested above is what I actually do. What I would like to do is to make this work automatic (some sort of GUI). My linker script are pretty complicated, with many different sections in flash/internal & external ram so it is a time consuming job to check the magic of linker scripts manually. – theAlse Jun 30 '11 at 10:04
up vote 2 down vote accepted

To my knowledge, there are no non-proprietary tools for this purpose.

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I am going to accept this as an answer as I have not seen a tool to do this yet! – theAlse Jun 18 '12 at 12:46

I don't know of any WYSIWYG editors for LD scripts but I may be able to help you graphically debug these types of problems.

I assume that this was a run-time problem and not a compile time problem. If that is the case then you can use the map output from the linker to get an idea of what is going on.

gcc -Wl,-Map=main.map main.c

The map file can then be parsed with grep or you can use a graphical viewer for the file to debug problems with sections and symbols.

You can also use nm to get similar results from a linked executable:

nm -S --size-sort a.out 
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