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I'm using Android, and I have a strange question: how can I parse JSON data that has the following format:

"2"

The JSON URL result is this number only, without any brackets ({ } or [ ]). How this array is formed? Thanks in advance.

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1  
Are you sure it's JSON? What does the Content-Type header have in it? –  kwo Jun 28 '11 at 13:35
    
The problem, actually, it's not really that. I have to read this result in a String, but I need for a login, and it can be: "2" or "WRONG_PASS" or "WRONG_USER" –  PiNuZ Jun 28 '11 at 14:03
    
Then just treat the response as text/plain and build an if-then-elseif-else statement. If the string does start with a curly brace, then parse it as JSON. –  kwo Jun 28 '11 at 14:19
    
@kwo: how? can you post a sample code please? –  PiNuZ Jun 28 '11 at 14:25
    
ok ok I solved my issue: simply, It was not JSON but only a String ! :) thank u for help to everybody :) –  PiNuZ Jun 29 '11 at 7:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First retrieve the remote URL and decide if it is JSON or text/plain

URL url = new URL("http://www.google.com/humans.txt");
HttpURLConnection http = (HttpURLConnection)url.openConnection();
int status = http.getResponseCode();
String contentType = http.getContentType();
String encoding = http.getContentEncoding() == null ? "utf-8" : http.getContentEncoding();

Read out the response body.

InputStream in = new BufferedInputStream(urlConnection.getInputStream());
ByteArrayOutputStream out = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
int len = 0;
byte[] buffer = new buffer[1024];
while (len = (in.read(buffer)) {
  out.write(buffer, 0, len);
}
String contents = new String(out.toByteArray(), encoding);

Based on the content type header you can decide if it is JSON or a plain/text contents. Alternatively, peek at the first character to see if it is an opening curly brace.

if (contentType == null) {
    // handle bad doc here
} else if (contentType.equals("application/json") || content.startsWith("{")) {
    // parse JSON document here
} else if (content.equals("2")) {
    // handle 2
} else if (content.equals("WRONG_PASS") || content.equals("WRONG_USER")) {
    // handle wrong user/pass
} else {
  // handle this as well
}
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ok ok I solved my issue: simply, It was not JSON but only a String ! :) thank u for help to everybody :) –  PiNuZ Jun 29 '11 at 7:54

That is not an array. It's not very clear from your question whether the quotation marks are included in the JSON or not. If yes, it's a valid JSON string. If not, it's a valid JSON number. Depending on the case, parsing it is very easy (using Android's built-in org.json parser):

String jsonString = (String) new JSONTokener("\"2\"").nextValue();

or:

int jsonInt = (Integer) new JSONTokener("2").nextValue();

Edit: to satisfy your scenario:

String jsonString = (String) new JSONTokener(someStringThatComesFromTheServer).nextValue();
if (jsonString.equals("WRONG_PASS")) {
  // do stuff
}
else if (jsonString.equals("WRONG_USER")) {
  // do stuff
}
else {
  // do stuff, such as:
  int userId = Integer.parseInt(jsonString);
}

Edit 2: I actually got in touch with Douglas Crockford, the author of RFC4627. It seems that:

Formally, no, but it is sometimes useful.

So yes, the others were right, it's not RFC-valid JSON. Sorry for confusing people. However, it seems that most parsers understand it.

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Yes, the marks are included, it's a valid JSON String –  PiNuZ Jun 28 '11 at 13:45
    
The problem, actually, it's not really that. I have to read this result in a String, but I need for a login, and it can be: "2" or "WRONG_PASS" or "WRONG_USER" –  PiNuZ Jun 28 '11 at 13:46
    
Please check out my edited answer. –  Felix Jun 28 '11 at 14:02
    
your example it's very clear but I can't try it because I have the result from URL already in a JSONObject. What can I put as argument of JSONTokener ( instead of someStringThatComesFromTheServer)? –  PiNuZ Jun 28 '11 at 14:12
    
-1 No, it's not valid JSON. Read the specification. –  Guffa Jun 28 '11 at 14:20

That is not a valid JSON string. So you can't really parse it as JSON.

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Uhm, but it is. –  Felix Jun 28 '11 at 13:39
    
Please refer to JSON documentation @ json.org. This Felix is right- in either scenario, string or number, this would be valid JSON. –  kakridge Jun 28 '11 at 13:42
1  
@Felix: No, JSON data either represents an object or an array: json.org You can also try it out at jsonlint.com –  Guffa Jun 28 '11 at 13:44
    
I don't see where it says that the top-level element must be either an Object or an Array on json.org. And jsonlint is either broken or too much like jslint: providing recommendations, not syntax correction. –  Felix Jun 28 '11 at 13:59
1  
@Felix: RFC 4627 says a JSON text can be only an object or an array. –  JeremyP Jun 28 '11 at 14:06

That is not valid JSON, so you can't parse it as that.

JSONLint says:

Parse error on line 1:
"2"
^
Expecting '{', '['

You can create valid JSON from it, either by putting it in an array:

["2"]

or in an object:

{"value":"2"}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem, actually, it's not really that. I have to read this result in a String, but I need for a login, and it can be: "2" or "WRONG_PASS" or "WRONG_USER" –  PiNuZ Jun 28 '11 at 13:52
    
@PiNuZ: All those are valid string values in JSON, but it's not valid JSON by itself. You can either wrap it in brackets to make it valid JSON, or you can parse it as something different than JSON. –  Guffa Jun 28 '11 at 14:01
    
JSONLint, just like JSLint, provides syntax recommendations, not validation. I have tried parsing "2" in Java's org.json, Chrome's native JSON parser (try JSON.parse("\"2\""); in the console) and Firefox's native JSON parser (just like in Chrome) and it works. –  Felix Jun 28 '11 at 14:04
    
I have this as a JSONObject from URL. I just want to convert into a string but my app chrashes... I DOn't understand why –  PiNuZ Jun 28 '11 at 14:14
    
@Felix: Just because some libraries accept invalid JSON doesn't make it valid. Read the specification. –  Guffa Jun 28 '11 at 14:19

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