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Let's say I have this type:

typedef boost::function<bool (Foo)> filter_function;

And a vector of those "filter functions":

std::vector<filter_function> filters;

If want to call all the filter functions, one by one, and only the the last call returned true.

Inspired by a previous question, I ended up writing:

bool Bar::filterFoo(Foo& foo)
{
  return (std::find_if(filters.begin(), filters.end(), boost::lambda::bind(boost::lambda::_1, foo)) == filters.end());
}

But this is wrong: the return value of the lambda should be negated.

I tried to use std::not1, std::not2 at different places but couldn't find any variation that doesn't end up in a (pretty verbose) compilation error.

What is the correct way to do this ?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can simply negate the return value.

bool Bar::filterFoo(Foo& foo)
{
  return (std::find_if(filters.begin(), filters.end(), !boost::lambda::bind(boost::lambda::_1, foo)) == filters.end());
}

or you can use lambda from c++0X

bool Bar::filterFoo(Foo& foo)
{
    return (std::find_if(filters.begin(), filters.end(), [&foo](filter_function& f){
        return !f(foo);
    }
    ) == filters.end());
}

To show a complete example that works at least for VS2010.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <boost/function.hpp>
#include <boost/lambda/lambda.hpp>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/lambda/bind.hpp>

using namespace std;

struct Foo{};

typedef boost::function<bool (Foo)> filter_function;
std::vector<filter_function> filters;

static int g_c = 0;
bool MyFunc(Foo /*foo*/)
{
    if(g_c > 1)
        return true;
    g_c++;
    return false;
}
bool filterFoo(Foo& foo)
{
    return (std::find_if(filters.begin(), filters.end(), boost::lambda::bind(boost::lambda::_1, foo)) == filters.end());
}
bool negatefilterFoo(Foo& foo)
{
    return (std::find_if(filters.begin(), filters.end(), !boost::lambda::bind(boost::lambda::_1, foo)) == filters.end());
}

int main() 
{
    Foo f;
    filters.push_back(boost::bind(&MyFunc, _1));
    filters.push_back(boost::bind(&MyFunc, _1));
    filters.push_back(boost::bind(&MyFunc, _1));
    std::cout << filterFoo(f) << std::endl;
    std::cout << negatefilterFoo(f) << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

It returns 0 and 1 on my machine.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. The ! operator doesn't seem to be overloaded for boost::lambda::bind as I get this compilation error: "no match for 'operator!' in '!boost::lambda::bind(const Arg1&, const Arg2)". And unfortunately, I can't use C++0x. –  ereOn Jun 28 '11 at 14:32
1  
I don't think ! will work since the 3rd parameter for find_if() is expecting a functor, and ! requires a bool. But then again, I don't know if C++0x changes this. –  void.pointer Jun 28 '11 at 14:35
    
@Robert. This works perfectly fine on my machine and VS2010 –  mkaes Jun 28 '11 at 14:36
    
@ereOn: Which compiler are you using and which boost version? –  mkaes Jun 28 '11 at 14:57
3  
To get ! to work, you need lambda.hpp, not just bind.hpp. That's where the operator overloads come from. Without lambda.hpp, you're stuck with the built-in operators, which obviously don't work the way you need them to. –  Rob Kennedy Jun 28 '11 at 15:49

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