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I am using Json.NET to serialize a class to json. I have the class like this:

class Test1
{
    [JsonProperty("id")]
    public string ID { get; set; }
    [JsonProperty("label")]
    public string Label { get; set; }
    [JsonProperty("url")]
    public string URL { get; set; }
    [JsonProperty("item")]
    public List<Test2> Test2List { get; set; }
}

I want to add a JsonIgnore() attribute to Test2List property only when Test2List is null. If it is not null then I want to include it in my json.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 51 down vote accepted

As per James Newton King: If you create the serializer yourself rather than using JavaScriptConvert there is a NullValueHandling property which you can set to ignore.

Here's a sample:

JsonSerializer _jsonWriter = new JsonSerializer
            {
                NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore
            };
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+1 Good answer. –  Kenan F. Deen Jun 28 '11 at 14:28
31  
This works :JsonConvert.SerializeObject(myObject, Newtonsoft.Json.Formatting.None, new JsonSerializerSettings { NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore}); –  Amit Jun 28 '11 at 14:34
    
@Amit: That's a good alternative too! +1 –  Mrchief Jun 28 '11 at 14:38
    
more details here: goo.gl/c8Bk1 –  Amit Jun 28 '11 at 14:41
    
Very helpful thanks! –  Ben Pretorius Mar 13 at 8:16

An alternate solution using the JsonProperty attribute:

[JsonProperty(NullValueHandling=NullValueHandling.Ignore)]
//or
[JsonProperty("property_name", NullValueHandling=NullValueHandling.Ignore)]

As seen in this online doc.

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1  
Good one..! I guess this serves the purpose too –  Amit May 5 '12 at 5:04
    
Your link page is now dead. Best find a new reference. –  TrueBlueAussie Sep 4 at 15:43

As can be seen in this link on their site (http://james.newtonking.com/archive/2009/10/23/efficient-json-with-json-net-reducing-serialized-json-size.aspx) I support using [Default()] to specify default values

Taken from the link

   public class Invoice
{
  public string Company { get; set; }
  public decimal Amount { get; set; }

  // false is default value of bool
  public bool Paid { get; set; }
  // null is default value of nullable
  public DateTime? PaidDate { get; set; }

  // customize default values
  [DefaultValue(30)]
  public int FollowUpDays { get; set; }
  [DefaultValue("")]
  public string FollowUpEmailAddress { get; set; }
}


Invoice invoice = new Invoice
{
  Company = "Acme Ltd.",
  Amount = 50.0m,
  Paid = false,
  FollowUpDays = 30,
  FollowUpEmailAddress = string.Empty,
  PaidDate = null
};

string included = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(invoice,
  Formatting.Indented,
  new JsonSerializerSettings { });

// {
//   "Company": "Acme Ltd.",
//   "Amount": 50.0,
//   "Paid": false,
//   "PaidDate": null,
//   "FollowUpDays": 30,
//   "FollowUpEmailAddress": ""
// }

string ignored = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(invoice,
  Formatting.Indented,
  new JsonSerializerSettings { DefaultValueHandling = DefaultValueHandling.Ignore });

// {
//   "Company": "Acme Ltd.",
//   "Amount": 50.0
// }
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Similar to @sirthomas's answer, JSON.NET also respects the EmitDefaultValue property on DataMemberAttribute:

[DataMember(Name="property_name", EmitDefaultValue=false)]

This may be desirable if you are already using [DataContract] and [DataMember] in your model type and don't want to add JSON.NET-specific attributes.

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