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Let's say we have two beans, defined in Spring

<bean class="foo.A"/>
<bean class="foo.B"/>
public class A {
   @Autowired
   private B b;
}

public class B {
   public void foo() {
      ...
   }
}

What I want to achieve is the interception of all calls to B.foo(). Looking at documentation, I wrote interceptor C and changed the definition of bean B as follows:

public class C implements org.springframework.aop.MethodBeforeAdvice {
    public void before(final Method method, final Object[] args, final Object target) {
        // interception logic goes here
    }
}
<bean class="foo.C"/>

<bean class="org.springframework.aop.framework.ProxyFactoryBean" scope="prototype">
    <property name="proxyTargetClass" value="true"/>
    <property name="singleton" value="false"/>
    <property name="target">
        <bean class="foo.B" scope="prototype"/>
    </property>
    <property name="interceptorNames">
        <list>
            <value>foo.C</value>
        </list>
    </property>
</bean>

Problem: when starting up, Spring container complains: No matching bean of type [foo.B] found for dependency: expected at least 1 bean which qualifies as autowire candidate for this dependency. In other words, it can't inject B into A because B is hidden behind org.springframework.aop.framework.ProxyFactoryBean and no longer "automagically" recognized. If I replace the definition into a simple class=foo.B, container starts fine. What's the best way to solve this?

Bonus question: is it possible to implement interception of B.foo() without involvement of ProxyFactoryBean and only using annotations (preferably without involvement of <aop:...)?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Define an interface for foo.B (e.g. foo.BInterface) and use foo.BInterface in the class A.

Also pay attention that Autowired injections are done only once. So if foo.A is singleton, it will receive only the first created instance of foo.B, while you want it to be a prototype.

Answer to bonus: Yes, but it may be more complicated. As a possible solution you can implement BeanPostProcessor. In the implementation you can replace the foo.B with dynamic proxy. So basically you do the same, but instead of using <aop: you do it yourself using basic Spring functionality. And again: you don't solve the "prototype is not autowired" problem and you still need an interface.

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I do have an interface for foo.B, so are you saying I should use a @Qualifier? And thanks for the warning - but bean A is also a prototype (which is always instantiated fresh when necessary), so I think I should be fine. –  mindas Jun 28 '11 at 14:53
    
No, I didn't say @Qualifier. IMO, if @Qualifier is needed, it's better not to use @Autowired at all. So you say that in class A you already use BInterface? –  Tarlog Jun 28 '11 at 14:58
    
But what if foo.B is not the only implementor of foo.BInterface? –  mindas Jun 28 '11 at 15:12
    
You'll get an exception... Just don't use @Autowired in this case. Inject it explicitly. –  Tarlog Jun 28 '11 at 15:20
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Perhaps you want to have the Bean 'foo.B' defined outside of the ProxyFactoryBean, and refer to it from the target property.

<bean class="foo.C"/>
<bean id="fooB" class="foo.B" scope="prototype"/>

<bean class="org.springframework.aop.framework.ProxyFactoryBean" scope="prototype">
   <property name="proxyTargetClass" value="true"/>
   <property name="singleton" value="false"/>
   <property name="target" ref="fooB"/>
   <property name="interceptorNames">
      <list>
         <value>foo.C</value>
      </list>
   </property>
</bean>
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I think the original bean (without AOP interceptor) will be injected in this solution. –  Tarlog Jun 28 '11 at 14:34
    
Tarlog - you're right, was too fast to accept this. –  mindas Jun 28 '11 at 14:49
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Tarlog's answer is correct, but to make it more clear: you should wire objects by their interface, not by their class:

public class A {
   @Autowired
   private C b;
}

public class B implements C{
   public void foo() {
      ...
   }
}
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