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For a videogame I'm implementing in my spare time, I've tried implementing my own versions of sinf(), cosf(), and atan2f(), using lookup tables. The intent is to have implementations that are faster, although with less accuracy.

My initial implementation is below. The functions work, and return good approximate values. The only problem is that they are slower than calling the standard sinf(), cosf(), and atan2f() functions.

So, what am I doing wrong?

// Geometry.h includes definitions of PI, TWO_PI, etc., as
// well as the prototypes for the public functions
#include "Geometry.h"

namespace {
    // Number of entries in the sin/cos lookup table
    const int SinTableCount = 512;

    // Angle covered by each table entry
    const float SinTableDelta = TWO_PI / (float)SinTableCount;

    // Lookup table for Sin() results
    float SinTable[SinTableCount];

    // This object initializes the contents of the SinTable array exactly once
    class SinTableInitializer {
    public:
        SinTableInitializer() {
            for (int i = 0; i < SinTableCount; ++i) {
                SinTable[i] = sinf((float)i * SinTableDelta);
            }
        }
    };
    static SinTableInitializer sinTableInitializer;

    // Number of entries in the atan lookup table
    const int AtanTableCount = 512;

    // Interval covered by each Atan table entry
    const float AtanTableDelta = 1.0f / (float)AtanTableCount;

    // Lookup table for Atan() results
    float AtanTable[AtanTableCount];

    // This object initializes the contents of the AtanTable array exactly once
    class AtanTableInitializer {
    public:
        AtanTableInitializer() {
            for (int i = 0; i < AtanTableCount; ++i) {
                AtanTable[i] = atanf((float)i * AtanTableDelta);
            }
        }
    };
    static AtanTableInitializer atanTableInitializer;

    // Lookup result in table.
    // Preconditions: y > 0, x > 0, y < x
    static float AtanLookup2(float y, float x) {
        assert(y > 0.0f);
        assert(x > 0.0f);
        assert(y < x);

        const float ratio = y / x;
        const int index = (int)(ratio / AtanTableDelta);
        return AtanTable[index];    
    }

}

float Sin(float angle) {
    // If angle is negative, reflect around X-axis and negate result
    bool mustNegateResult = false;
    if (angle < 0.0f) {
        mustNegateResult = true;
        angle = -angle;
    }

    // Normalize angle so that it is in the interval (0.0, PI)
    while (angle >= TWO_PI) {
        angle -= TWO_PI;
    }

    const int index = (int)(angle / SinTableDelta);
    const float result = SinTable[index];

    return mustNegateResult? (-result) : result;
}

float Cos(float angle) {
    return Sin(angle + PI_2);
}

float Atan2(float y, float x) {
    // Handle x == 0 or x == -0
    // (See atan2(3) for specification of sign-bit handling.)
    if (x == 0.0f) {
        if (y > 0.0f) {
            return PI_2;
        }
        else if (y < 0.0f) {
            return -PI_2;
        }
        else if (signbit(x)) {
            return signbit(y)? -PI : PI;
        }
        else {
            return signbit(y)? -0.0f : 0.0f;
        }
    }

    // Handle y == 0, x != 0
    if (y == 0.0f) {
        return (x > 0.0f)? 0.0f : PI;
    }

    // Handle y == x
    if (y == x) {
        return (x > 0.0f)? PI_4 : -(3.0f * PI_4);
    }

    // Handle y == -x
    if (y == -x) {
        return (x > 0.0f)? -PI_4 : (3.0f * PI_4);
    }

    // For other cases, determine quadrant and do appropriate lookup and calculation
    bool right = (x > 0.0f);
    bool top = (y > 0.0f);
    if (right && top) {
        // First quadrant
        if (y < x) {
            return AtanLookup2(y, x);
        }
        else {
            return PI_2 - AtanLookup2(x, y);
        }
    }
    else if (!right && top) {
        // Second quadrant
        const float posx = fabsf(x);
        if (y < posx) {
            return PI - AtanLookup2(y, posx);
        }
        else {
            return PI_2 + AtanLookup2(posx, y);
        }
    }
    else if (!right && !top) {
        // Third quadrant
        const float posx = fabsf(x);
        const float posy = fabsf(y);
        if (posy < posx) {
            return -PI + AtanLookup2(posy, posx);
        }
        else {
            return -PI_2 - AtanLookup2(posx, posy);
        }
    }
    else { // right && !top
        // Fourth quadrant
        const float posy = fabsf(y);
        if (posy < x) {
            return -AtanLookup2(posy, x);
        }
        else {
            return -PI_2 + AtanLookup2(x, posy);
        }
    }

    return 0.0f;
}
share|improve this question
    
well, presumably the inbuilt ones are hand optimised, and prob. as fast as is possible! –  Mitch Wheat Mar 16 '09 at 15:08
    
have you actually determined that the inbuilt ones are a bottleneck?? –  Mitch Wheat Mar 16 '09 at 15:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

"Premature optimization is the root of all evil" - Donald Knuth

Nowadays compilers provide very efficient intrinsics for trigonometric functions that get the best from modern processors (SSE etc.), which explains why you can hardly beat the built-in functions. Don't lose too much time on these parts and instead concentrate on the real bottlenecks that you can spot with a profiler.

share|improve this answer
1  
Quote: Wrongly attributed to Knuth. Hoare seems to be the originator though Hoare disclaims it according to the Wikipedia article -- en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C._A._R._Hoare –  dirkgently Mar 16 '09 at 15:31
    
@dirkgently: thx for the info! –  fbonnet Mar 17 '09 at 9:31
    
Knuth was the first one to put it in print (in his seminal "Structured Programming with GOTOs"). Quoting Wikipedia as a source is like saying, "some random guy on teh interwebs says...." –  Michael Dorfman Mar 17 '09 at 9:33
    
Wikipedia is handy. Specially if you know it is correct. –  dirkgently Mar 17 '09 at 19:54

Remember you have a co-processor ... you would have seen an increase in speed if it were 1993 ... however today you will struggle to beat native intrinsics.

Try viewing the disassebly to sinf.

share|improve this answer

Someone has already benchmarked this, and it looks as though the Trig.Math functions are already optimized, and will be faster than any lookup table you can come up with:

http://www.tommti-systems.de/go.html?http://www.tommti-systems.de/main-Dateien/reviews/languages/benchmarks.html

(They didn't use anchors on the page so you have to scroll about 1/3 of the way down)

share|improve this answer

I'm worried by this place:

// Normalize angle so that it is in the interval (0.0, PI)
while (angle >= TWO_PI) {
    angle -= TWO_PI;
}

But you can: Add time-meters to all functions, write special performance tests, run performance tests, print report of time test.. I think you will know answer after this tests.

Also you could use some profiling tools such as AQTime.

share|improve this answer

The built-in functions are very well optimized already, so it's going to be REALLY tough to beat them. Personally, I'd look elsewhere for places to gain performance.

That said, one optimization I can see in your code:

// Normalize angle so that it is in the interval (0.0, PI)
while (angle >= TWO_PI) {
    angle -= TWO_PI;
}

Could be replaced with:

angle = fmod(angle, TWO_PI);
share|improve this answer
    
no. because angle has float value. –  bayda Mar 16 '09 at 15:42
    
perhaps use fmod() –  basszero Mar 16 '09 at 16:22

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