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I am using Java + iBatis and have a need to call an Oracle Stored Procedure that takes a cursor as an argument. Google didn't help me much in finding a code sample of how to call a stored procedure that accepts a cursor as an argument from java.

How can this be accomplished?

Scenario in steps:

 1. Java calls a Stored Proc passing primitives (varchar, char, etc) as
    parameters 
 2. Java retrieves the cursor returned from Step 1 
 3. Java calls a Stored Proc passing cursor from Step 2 as an argument  //how? 
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If those are really the only steps -- i.e. you aren't doing anything of importance in Java between the two calls -- then it makes more sense to me to avoid returning to Java at all.

If the first procedure were actually a function, you could simply do a single nested call:

BEGIN proc2(proc1(...)); END;

The cursor gets passed within Oracle and never needs to be handled by Java at all.

If your first procedure is a procedure that returns the cursor as an OUT parameter, you could write a wrapper function for it and do the same thing:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION func1(...)
  RETURN SYS_REFCURSOR
  AS
    foo SYS_REFCURSOR;
  BEGIN
    proc1(..., foo);
    RETURN foo;
  END func1;
/

Then BEGIN proc2(func1(...)); END; should work.

Now, if you really do need to go out to Java between the two calls, then I would try using OracleTypes.CURSOR when retrieving the output value from the first procedure, then simply pass that object into the second procedure. I don't know if this will work; if not, then there's probably no direct way to do it.

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there is more to the steps. Basic reason is that SP in step 1 resides on one DB and SP in step 3 resides on another DB. Right now we handle this via the DBLink but we are looking for ways to avoid the DB link. So that's why we need to call SP on box 1, get the results and then pass those results to SP on box 2 –  Omnipresent Jun 28 '11 at 15:25
    
@Omnipresent: ah, well that makes things different :) There is absolutely no way to pass an open cursor from one instance to another -- the cursor is essentially a structure in instance memory. –  Dave Costa Jun 28 '11 at 15:35
    
more I research and find nothing makes me believe that this is a bad path to take. thanks –  Omnipresent Jun 28 '11 at 15:37
    
@omnipresent: I seriously doubt that a home grown workaround for a dblink is going to be better than just using the dblink. Its not perfect, but a lot of effort and thought went into the use of dblinks (transactions, read consistency, support, etc), its part of what you pay for. Again, not the solution for everything distributed, but why are you trying so hard to avoid dblinks? –  tbone Jun 28 '11 at 18:21
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You can't do this.

A cursor passed into an Oracle stored procedure represents an object with an API that only Oracle can provide. Your Java program doesn't know enough about the cursor to create some sort of object that would proxy it and forward the calls back to Oracle.

Your going to have to redesign your app so that the stored procedure that takes an input cursor is only called from another stored procedure.

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One thing you could do is read the data for the cursor, and pass that data as a nested table to a new stored procedure, which would call the stored proc with a cursor input parameter using a cursor over the passed in data. But this would be much less efficient than if the the cursor never went to the Java side. –  antlersoft Jun 28 '11 at 15:18
    
interesting...I will try to convince the folks to change the underlying architecture rather than cutting corners. thats what this solution means. –  Omnipresent Jun 28 '11 at 16:02
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