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Every time I run git diff, for each single changes I made, I get some sort of header with numbers, for example:

@@ -169,14 +167,12 @@ function Browser(window, document, body, XHR, $log) {.....

I wonder what does the four numbers mean? I guess -169 means that this particular line of code that follows was originally in line 169 but now is in 167? And what do 14 and 12 mean?

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marked as duplicate by Ciro Santilli 巴拿馬文件 六四事件 法轮功, David Brabant, Soner Gönül, dinsdale, N3dst4 Jan 29 at 14:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 30 down vote accepted

This header is called set of change, or hunk. Each hunk starts with a line that contains, enclosed in @@, the line or line range from,no-of-lines in the file before (with a -) and after (with a +) the changes. After that come the lines from the file. Lines starting with a - are deleted, lines starting with a + are added. Each line modified by the patch is surrounded with 3 lines of context before and after.

An addition looks like this:

@@ -75,6 +103,8 @@
 foo
 bar
 baz
+line1
+line2
 more context
 and more
 and still context

That means, in the original file after line 78 (= 75 + 3 lines of context) add two lines. These will be lines 106 (= 103 + 3 lines of context) through 107 after all changes.
Note the difference in from numbers (-75 vs +103), this means that there were other changes in this file before this particular hunk, that added 28 (103 - 75) lines of code.

A deletion looks like this:

@@ -75,7 +75,6 @@
 foo
 bar
 baz
-line1
 more context
 and more
 and still context

That means, delete line 78 (= 75 + 3 lines of context) in the original file. The unchanged context will be on lines 75 to 80 after all changes.
Note that from numbers in this hunk are equal (-75 and +75), this means that either there were no changes before this hunk, or amount of added and deleted lines in previous changes are the same.

Finally, a change looks like this:

@@ -70,7 +70,7 @@
 foo
 bar
 baz
-red
+blue
 more context
 and more
 still context

That means, change line 73 (= 70 + 3 lines of context) in the file before all changes, which contains red to blue. The changed line is also line 73 (= 70 + 3 lines of context) in the file after all changes.

Credit goes to Markus Bertheau.

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6  
Short answer: 14 in your case is amount of lines in hunk before applying the changes, 12 - after. – Andrejs Cainikovs Jun 28 '11 at 15:31
4  
The no-of-lines values may not be immediately obvious. The 'before' value is the sum of the 3 lead context lines, the number of - lines, and the 3 trailing context lines, while the 'after' values is the sum of 3 lead context lines, the number of + lines and the 3 trailing lines. In some cases there are additional intermediate context lines which are also added to those numbers. So the total number of lines displayed is commonly neither of the no-of-lines values! – Philip Oakley Mar 25 '13 at 21:35
3  
There's a red herring in the first example of adding 2 lines: @@ -75,6 +77,8 @@. The 75 and 77 may confuse newbie to think that was related to adding 2 lines. Actually, a simpler example would just have @@ -75,6 +75,8 @@. The +77 would only be if there were other edits higher up that added a net of 2 lines. – wisbucky Aug 28 '13 at 4:31
    
@AndrejsCainikovs Is there a reason for the 75/77 difference in the first example? – Holloway Oct 14 '14 at 14:40
    
@Trengot Yes. I wanted to show that those numbers are not always equal. from numbers can be different in case if there were other changes before. I will update my answer with that. – Andrejs Cainikovs Oct 15 '14 at 8:34

Summary:

  • Assume git diff will output [0-3] lines of context [before/after] [first/last] changes

@@ -[original file's number of first line displayed],[context lines + removed lines] +[changed file's number of first line displayed],[context lines + added lines] @@

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I wonder what does the four numbers mean?

Let's analyze a simple example

The format is basically the same the diff -u unified diff.

We start with numbers from 1 to 16 and remove 2, 3, 14 and 15:

diff -u <(seq 16) <(seq 16 | grep -Ev '^(2|3|14|15)$')

Output:

@@ -1,6 +1,4 @@
 1
-2
-3
 4
 5
 6
@@ -11,6 +9,4 @@
 11
 12
 13
-14
-15
 16

@@ -1,6 +1,4 @@ means:

  • -1,6: this piece corresponds to line 1 to 6 of the first file:

    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    

    - means "old", as we usually invoke it as diff -u old new.

  • +1,4 says that this piece corresponds to line 1 to 4 of the second file.

    + means "new".

    We only have 4 lines instead of 6 because 2 lines were removed! The new hunk is just:

    1
    4
    5
    6
    

@@ -11,6 +9,4 @@ for the second hunk is analogous:

  • on the old file, we have 6 lines, starting at line 11 of the old file:

    11
    12
    13
    14
    15
    16
    
  • on the new file, we have 4 lines, starting at line 9 of the new file:

    11
    12
    13
    16
    

    Note that line 11 is the 9th line of the new file because we have already removed 2 lines on the previous hunk: 2 and 3.

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