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Say I have a type that implements a property with a string type:

public class Record
{
     public string Value { get; set; }
}

Then I have an interface that defines a property with the same name:

public interface IIntValued
{
     public int Value { get; set; }
}

I can use explicit interface as follows:

public class Record : IIntValued
{
     public string Value { get; set; }
     int IIntValued.Value 
     {
          get{ return 0; } set{}
     }
}

However, if I want to be able to reference the string "Value" in my explicit interface, can I do it? If so, how? I imagine it to be something like:

public class Record : IIntValued
{
     public string Value { get; set; }
     public int IIntValued.Value 
     {
          get
          {
               string value = /*Magic here*/.Value;
               return int.parse(value); 
          } 
          set{}
     }
}

As you can see, I want the "string valued" "Value" property for an expression in the "int valued" "Value" property. If it were another explicitly implemented interface member, I could typecast to that Interface and then use, but how would it work for an implicit type member?

Note: The example is a bit contrived, but hopefully demonstrates the language question.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For an implicit type member, just Value or this.Value should be fine - because it won't resolve to IIntValued.Value by default.

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So the compiler does automatically what I was thinking i had to do manually. sigh I guess its not a loss, though, as now a few new pieces of C# have clicked in my brain. Thanks! –  automatonic Mar 16 '09 at 15:41

Yes, you can access both properties. It depends on the type of the variable used to access the property. Observe:

Record myInstanceAsRecord = myInstance;
IIntValued myInstanceAsIIntValued = myinstance;

string valueAsString = myInstanceAsRecord.Value;
int valueAsInt = myInstanceAsIIntValued.Value;
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Ugh, after writing the summary, I realized that I knew the answer. :P If I take this and typecast it to the class type, then the explict implementation will not be included:

string value = ((Record)this).Value; //is the implicit string.

Edit: After some further input (Thanks responders!) it was pointed out that there is no need to manually do something that the compiler is doing automatically. Thus:

string value = this.Value;

would have worked. This is, of course, because the this is not an interface variable, and so the implicit property would be the one selected by default.

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Sure you can! The problem is that you were placing accessibility keywords where they are illegal. Explicitly-implemented members can not have an accessibility keyword. An implicitly-implemented would be written with out the IIntValue. prefix to the member name.

Here's a sample that works.

public interface IIntValued
{
  int Value { get; set; }
}

public class Record : IIntValued
{
  public string Value { get; set; }
  int IIntValued.Value
  {
    get
    {
      string value = this.Value;
      return int.Parse(value);
    }
    set { }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
the "public" was just a mistype in my mocked up example, but +1 for pointing it out the distinction (something i had previously glossed over) –  automatonic Mar 16 '09 at 15:43

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