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I try to get this code to work with the 3 input fields, but it works only with the first :

<form>  
<p><input id="qty" type="text" maxlength="1"  /></p>
<p><input id="qty" name="text" type="text"  /></p>
<p><input id="qty" name="text2" type="text" /></p>
</form>

<script type="text/javascript">

$("#qty").change(function(e) {
    if(this.value != '3' && this.value != '6' && this.value != '9') {
        this.value = 0;         
        alert('You can buy only 3, 6, or 9 pieces fromn this product');
    } });

</script>

What can be my error ?

share|improve this question
    
You cannot have 3 things with the same ID –  Neal Jun 28 '11 at 15:37

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cannot have 3 things with the same ID try using classes instead:

<form>  
<p><input class="qty" type="text" maxlength="1"  /></p>
<p><input class="qty" name="text" type="text"  /></p>
<p><input class="qty" name="text2" type="text" /></p>
</form>

<script type="text/javascript">

$(".qty").change(function(e) {
    if(this.value != '3' && this.value != '6' && this.value != '9') {
        this.value = 0;         
        alert('You can buy only 3, 6, or 9 pieces fromn this product');
    } });

</script>
share|improve this answer
1  
wrong wrong wrong wrong. –  Kon Jun 28 '11 at 15:44
    
@Samuel, why on earth would i do that?? –  Neal Jun 28 '11 at 15:45
    
Why this was downoted?? Anyone care to explain the reason?? –  rahul Jun 28 '11 at 15:46
1  
@rahul bc they are mad at me for telling them they are wrong. This answer is completely correct –  Neal Jun 28 '11 at 15:47
1  
@BizBoss i repeat: why do u need window.onbeforeload? –  Neal Jun 28 '11 at 15:57

You cannot have multiple elements with the same ID.

Use a classname instead.

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It only works on the first, because you're connecting the event to the ID, and using the same ID multiple times. IDs can only be used once on a given page in order to be useful.

Referencing element IDs in jQuery will only match the first occurrence in the DOM - this is how they work. Use a class instead.

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Try giving all the text boxes unique ids.

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Your problem is your use of the id attribute.

An id is unique. Therefore only ONE element on the page can have the id qty.

Use class instead and then all three can have class='qty'.

And change this to $('this')

share|improve this answer
    
remove that last part, and this is a fully correct answer and deserves a +1 –  Neal Jun 28 '11 at 15:51
    
No. See stackoverflow.com/questions/1051782/jquery-this-vs-this - this == $('this')[0] be careful of this. When dealing with jQuery ALWAYS use $('this') –  Thomas Clayson Jun 29 '11 at 8:40

You cannot have more than one element with the same id. Use a class instead.

Also embed you change event inside document ready event.

$(function(){
    $("input:text.myclass").change(function(e){
        if(this.value != '3' && this.value != '6' && this.value != '9') {
            this.value = 0;         
            alert('You can buy only 3, 6, or 9 pieces fromn this product');
        }
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Please explain the reason for downvote whenever you are doing it. –  rahul Jun 28 '11 at 15:50
    
+1 from me. this looks completely correct –  Neal Jun 28 '11 at 15:53

ID attribute is a unique identifier of an element and you can't have duplicates within a page. So change your IDs to class names and you'll be good to go:

<p><input class="qty" type="text" maxlength="1"  /></p>
<p><input class="qty" name="text" type="text"  /></p>
<p><input class="qty" name="text2" type="text" /></p>

Also, you have to reference the element via jQuery wrapper when you're dealing with it within jQuery context. this becomes $(this) and value property becomes val() function call.

Change to this:

$(".qty").change(function(e) {
  var value = $(this).val();

    if(value != '3' && value != '6' && value != '9') {
        $(this).val(0);         
        alert('You can buy only 3, 6, or 9 pieces fromn this product');
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
wrong wrong wrong wrong. there was nothing wrong with the way the OP did the statements –  Neal Jun 28 '11 at 15:41

I'm not sure if this is the solution, but in jQuery you have to use $(this) instead of this. Then, you also have to use .val() instead of value.

So you have to use something like this:

$(this).val()

To get the value of a field, to set the value, use this:

$(this).val('new value')

Edit: After you added the code: Like, others said, you can't use an id multiple times.

Edit 2: Ignore my answer, totally wrong. Excuse me.

share|improve this answer
    
Using just "this" and "this.value" is also correct, its just "javascript" :-) –  Blauesocke Jun 28 '11 at 15:38
1  
@Ray: I'm not the downvoter, but this.value is perfectly valid JavaScript and is, in fact, more efficient than doing $(this).val(). –  Town Jun 28 '11 at 15:39
    
Yes I know, but I thought you can't use jQuery functions when using 'this'. Correct me if I'm wrong. –  Ray Jun 28 '11 at 15:40
    
it's the same thing with $(this) –  Bizboss Jun 28 '11 at 15:41
2  
@Ray: you can't do this.val(), as that's using a jQuery function on a DOM element. However, this.value is correct. –  Town Jun 28 '11 at 15:42

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