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I currently trying to set up an association with the following. For example, I currently have these three tables:

  • User
    • UserId
  • Company
    • CompanyId
  • Account
    • AccountId

I want the "AccountId" to reference "UserId" OR "CompanyId".

I tried:

FOREIGN KEY (AccountId) REFERENCES User (UserId),
FOREIGN KEY (AccountId) REFERENCES Company (CompanyId)

but this set "AccountId" to reference "UserId" AND "CompanyId".

I was wondering if anyone would have any recommendations?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why do not you set UserId or CompanyId as per the AccountID. I mean reverse the reference order. Since each user or company will have an account so first create an account entry then just link it to the corresponding user or company entry.

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But I am trying to have 1 "User" will have many "Account" though...If I set "Account" first, then it means 1 "Account" will have many "User". –  YTKColumba Jun 30 '11 at 0:43
    
I don't think that OR type of referential integrity is possible. But as you said you want 1 user to have many accounts. So you may have a field Accounts where you may store all the associated accounts of the user. I mean multi-valued attribute. I know it is not a good practice but that seems the only possible solution to me for your problem. Or if you are using some scripting language then you may check the referential integrity using that. –  Nishchay Sharma Jun 30 '11 at 6:28
    
Could you please give an example? –  YTKColumba Jul 2 '11 at 1:58
    
From you suggestion, I came up with this... http://i.min.us/idSbAK.jpg –  YTKColumba Jul 2 '11 at 2:17
    
Yes, this is exactly what i meant. –  Nishchay Sharma Jul 2 '11 at 13:37

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