Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can someone please explain why hashCode is called in the example below?

import java.util.List;

public class JSSTest extends Object{

    public static void main(String args[]){

        JSSTest a = new JSSTest();
        JSSTest b = new JSSTest();
        List<JSSTest> list = new java.util.ArrayList<JSSTest>();
        list.add(a);
        list.add(b);
        System.out.println(list.get(0));
        System.out.println(list.get(1));
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj){
        System.out.println("equals");
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode(){
        System.out.println("hashCode");
        return super.hashCode();
    }
}

Outcome:

hashCode 0
JSSTest@1bab50a
hashCode 0
JSSTest@c3c749
share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried taking a stack trace or adding a breakpoint at line in a debugger? –  Peter Lawrey Jun 28 '11 at 16:44
2  
It would be a huge clue to look at the number 1bab50a or c3c749 and see how it compares to the object's hashcode. –  Mark Peters Jun 28 '11 at 16:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The default toString() implementation calls hashCode. This has nothing to do with lists.

Here's a fairly minimal repro:

public class JSSTest {

    public static void main(String args[]){
        JSSTest test = new JSSTest();
        // Just to show it's not part of creation...
        System.out.println("After object creation");
        test.toString();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj){
        System.out.println("equals");
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode(){
        System.out.println("hashCode");
        return super.hashCode();
    }
}

(You could override toString() to display before / super call / after details, too.)

It's documented in Object.toString():

The toString method for class Object returns a string consisting of the name of the class of which the object is an instance, the at-sign character `@', and the unsigned hexadecimal representation of the hash code of the object. In other words, this method returns a string equal to the value of:

getClass().getName() + '@' + Integer.toHexString(hashCode())
share|improve this answer
System.out.println(list.get(0));

I believe it's part of the Object.toString() method that all objects have unless you override toString() in your own class. Try that and see.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx. Thats correct too but can only mark one correct answer. Given u tickup :) –  JSS Jun 28 '11 at 17:00

because the toString() implementation in Object calls it..

 public String toString() {
    return getClass().getName() + "@" + Integer.toHexString(hashCode());
    }

Overwrite toString, and it won't be called

share|improve this answer
    
Thx. Thats correct too but can only mark one correct answer. Given u tickup :) –  JSS Jun 28 '11 at 17:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.