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I'm trying to learn C, and I'm hung up a bit on Pointers to Pointers. I think I understand why you need them, but can't quite get my head wrapped around what is happening.

For instance, the following code doesn't seem to work as I would expect it to:

#include <stdio.h>

int newp(char **p) {
  char d = 'b';
  *p = &d;
  /*printf("**p = %c\n", **p);*/
  return 1;
}

int main() {
  char c = 'a';
  char *p = &c;
  int result;

  result = newp(&p);
  printf("result = %d\n", result);
  printf("*p = %c\n", *p);
  printf("c = %c\n", c);

  return 0;
}

The result I get is this:

result = 1
*p = 
c = a

*p prints as nothing. Instead, I would expect *p = b.

However, if I uncomment line 6 (the printf in the newp function), then I get this:

**p = b
result = 1
*p = b
c = a

What am I missing?

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

You are dealing with undefined behaviour. The variable d is local (resides on the stack) and is not available after the enclosing function (newp) returns.

When dereferencing p outside newp, the address on the stack &d may be overwritten by some other local variable or it may contain garbage.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Coming from Ruby and other dynamic languages, I forget that the C compiler is less forgiving on scope. – Tim Morgan Jun 28 '11 at 17:07
1  
1) It's not the compiler; it's the language specification. 2) C allows for more fine-grained control over scope, but that's not the real problem here. The problem is that C has value semantics by default and expects you to do manual memory management. (Putting things on the stack and letting them die at the end of the function is a form of this.) The "other dynamic languages" have reference semantics by default, and keep the underlying values around until garbage collection algorithms kick in. – Karl Knechtel Jun 28 '11 at 18:34
    
Point taken. Thanks! – Tim Morgan Jun 28 '11 at 18:39

You are storing the address of a local variable (d) in *p and then dereferencing it when the variable has gone out of scope. Undefined Behavior

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2  
Thank you - that seems so obvious now! – Tim Morgan Jun 28 '11 at 16:55

You might be "missing" the keyword static, as in:

int newp(char **p) {
    static char d = 'b';   /* <--- HERE */
    *p = &d;
    /*printf("**p = %c\n", **p);*/
    return 1;
}

This static keyword causes the compiler to locate the local variable in "static storage," which continues to exist (i.e. maintains its value) during the time periods after newp() has been called. However, there is only one copy of this memory -- each subsequent invocation of the containing function (newp) re-uses the same memory location and may overwrite the value at that time.

Without the static keyword to qualify your local variable declaration, the storage will be "automatic", which means that it is automatically discharged from current use after the containing function has returned. After newp returns, the memory formerly used for the local variable can be reused for any purpose.

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You should use the heap instead of the stack, Memory Stack vs Heap:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int newp(char **p) {
  char *d = malloc(sizeof(char));
  *d = 'b';
  *p = d;
  /*printf("**p = %c\n", **p);*/
  return 1;
}

int main() {
  char c = 'a';
  char *p = &c;
  int result;

  result = newp(&p);
  printf("result = %d\n", result);
  printf("*p = %c\n", *p);
  printf("c = %c\n", c);

  free(p);

  return 0;
}

Getting this output:

result = 1
*p = b
c = a
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