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In Fortran, is it possible for declaration statements for variables to refer to previously-declared variables? For example, when I try the following:

PROGRAM test3
  IMPLICIT NONE

  INTEGER :: a=2286
  INTEGER :: b=a/3

  WRITE(*,*) a, b
END PROGRAM test3

I get a compile-time error message:

test3.f90:5.16:

  INTEGER :: b=a/3
                1
Error: Parameter 'a' at (1) has not been declared or is a variable, which
does not reduce to a constant expression

On the other hand, if I assign b to a/2 in a statement separate from the declaration of b, it compiles and runs fine:

PROGRAM test3
  IMPLICIT NONE

  INTEGER :: a=2286
  INTEGER :: b
  b=a/3

  WRITE(*,*) a, b
END PROGRAM test3

which gives me the correct output:

2286         762

Why is this the case--that previously-declared variables cannot be included in declaration statements of new variables? Am I doing something wrong? Or is this just a "Fortran fact of life"?

Thank you very much for your time!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The error message is pretty explicit. Initializers using in variable declarations have to be constant values. In your example, a is not a constant.

It should work like this:

PROGRAM test3
  IMPLICIT NONE

  INTEGER, PARAMETER :: a=2286
  INTEGER :: b=a/3

  WRITE(*,*) a, b
END PROGRAM test3

because then a is a constant.

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Thank you kindly! –  Andrew Jun 28 '11 at 17:13

Let me just add one more thing: Initializing a variable like this works in main programs and for parameters (well, you have to initialize them like this for parameters), but it can surprise you with its behaviour if you get too used to using it and start using it in subroutines and functions:

For instance, most of us would initially assume that this program:

program foo

   call bar
   call bar

contains

  subroutine bar
  integer :: i=3

      print '(A,I3)','At start of bar: i = ', i
      i = i + 1
      print '(A,I3)','At end of bar:   i = ', i
  end subroutine bar

end program foo

would print

At start of bar: i =   3
At end of bar:   i =   4
At start of bar: i =   3
At end of bar:   i =   4

--- but it doesn't. It prints

At start of bar: i =   3
At end of bar:   i =   4
At start of bar: i =   4
At end of bar:   i =   5

This is for "historical reasons", as things often are when they present behaviours which seem clearly wrong. Initializing a variable at declaration essentially turns this:

integer :: i

into

integer, save :: i = 3

and the initialization is done only the first time. That means the second time through, the variable remembers it's previous value (4) and increments that.

So my reason for writing this is basically to warn you not to get too comfortable initializing variables at declaration time. I recommend doing it for parameters, and in the main program (where you won't hit this issue since you only enter the main program once) and little else.

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Wow, this is VERY helpful. Thank you for pointing this out; I'll keep this in mind. –  Andrew Jun 28 '11 at 17:43

Add ", parameter" to the declaration of "a". This will allow you to use the value of a in another declaration. It also means that the value of the "variable" a cannot be changed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you kindly! –  Andrew Jun 28 '11 at 17:13

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