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I am new to Python, and noticed something I believe its a bug.

Edit 2011-09-30: Forget it. Now I know the attributes created are static and shared between the instances. Hope this thread helps another python newbies in the same situation as mine.

Consider the following code:

class test():

    dictionary1 = {}
    list1 = []

    def method1(self):
        self.dictionary1.update({'1': 'unique entry'})
        self.list1 = ['unique list entry']

t=test()

print 'dictionary1 value:', t.dictionary1
print 'list1 value:', t.list1
t.method1()
print 'dictionary1 new value:', t.dictionary1
print 'list1 new value:', t.list1

t2=test()
print 'dictionary1 value:', t2.dictionary1, " -- error -- I just instantiated the class. The correct value would be {}"
print 'list1 value:', t.list1
t2.method1()
print 'dictionary1 new value:', t.dictionary1
print 'list1 new value:', t.list1

Now the question:

Why in line 19 the executed code shows: {'1': 'unique entry'}. I belive it would be: {} Note that the list has the correct value: [] (empty list in line 20)

Using Python 2.6.6 (r266:84292, Sep 15 2010, 15:52:39) 
[GCC 4.4.5] on linux2

Sorry not so good english. From Brazil.

Edit 2011-09-30: Forget it. Now I know the attributes created are static and shared between the instances. Hope this thread helps another python newbies in the same situation as mine.

share|improve this question
24  
Rule no. 1: The bug is in your code or in your understanding of the feature, not in that mature, well-tested implementation. – delnan Jun 28 '11 at 17:23
2  
Your code is totally broken. Post something that actually runs. – Daenyth Jun 28 '11 at 17:23
4  
It does what it should: you're using a static class variable. – trutheality Jun 28 '11 at 17:29
3  
@Tarmac - In clear English: Please don't say you've found a bug unless you're absolutely sure it's not your fault. People get annoyed if it looks like you're blaming others. – Thomas K Jun 28 '11 at 17:33
4  
Please don't be mean with the OP, he did said he's new. Please do not bite the newcomers. – Evpok Jun 28 '11 at 19:06

All your instances of test class share the same dictionary and list. The correct way to initialize the members would be:

class Test():
    def __init__(self):
        self.dictionary1 = {}
        self.list1 = []

Attributes assigned directly in the class body will be evaluated once and then shared between all instances. Since the __init__ method is run once per instance, a new list and dictionary will be created for each instance.

share|improve this answer
3  
And they share them because what OP declared were class variables (similar to static members in other languages). – delnan Jun 28 '11 at 17:24

Variables directly declared in the class body (static class variables) are shared among all instances of the class. Therefore, it's not a good idea to change them.

Instead, initialize object member variables in the constructor:

class test(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.dictionary1 = {}
    def method1(self):
        self.dictionary1.update({'1': 'unique entry'})
share|improve this answer

To add to the other answers, the reason you see different behaviour for the dict and the list is: when you write self.dictionary1.update({'1': 'unique entry'}), you change the contents of self.dictionary1, but it's still the same dict object. When you write self.list1 = ['unique list entry'], you replace self.list1 with a new list object. You would get the same behaviour as with the dict by doing: self.list1.append('unique list entry').

share|improve this answer
    
self.list1 = ... isn't replacing anything, since there's nothing to replace, the instances' __dict__ does not have the key 'list1', it's just adding it. It happens that the class's – SingleNegationElimination Jun 28 '11 at 22:56
    
Sorry; it's adding an attribute to the instance which hides the attribute of the class. – Karl Knechtel Jun 29 '11 at 2:12

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