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I have an application that reads information from a text file and then categorizes them and puts them onto a Database. For one category, I need to check the line that comes right after the current line and look for a certain keyword?

How do i get to read this line? This should happen when the streamreader has the current line already open....

I'm using c# on VS2010.

Edit:

All of the code below is in a while (!sReader.EndOfStream) loop

 string line = sReader.ReadLine(); //Note: this is used way above and lots of things are done before we come to this loop

 for (int i = 0; i < filter_length; i++)
 {
       if (searchpattern_queries[i].IsMatch(line) == true)
       {
               logmessagtype = selected_queries[i];

               //*Here i need to add a if condition to check if the type is "RESTARTS" and i need to get the next line to do more classification. I need to get that line only to classify the current one. So, I'd want it to be open independently *

               hit = 1;
               if (logmessagtype == "AL-UNDEF")
               {
                   string alid = AlarmID_Search(line);
                   string query = "SELECT Severity from Alarms WHERE ALID like '" +alid +"'";
                   OleDbCommand cmdo = new OleDbCommand(query, conn);
                   OleDbDataReader reader;
                   reader = cmdo.ExecuteReader();
                   while (reader.Read())
                   {
                        if (reader.GetString(0).ToString() == null)
                        { }
                        else
                        {
                             string severity = reader.GetString(0).ToString();
                             if (severity == "1")
                                 //Keeps going on.....

Also, the .log files that are opened might go upto 50 Mb types... ! Which is why i dont really prefer reading all lines and keeping track!

share|improve this question
    
StreamReader does not "have a line open". –  Henk Holterman Jun 28 '11 at 17:45
    
Can't you just call StreamReader.ReadLine() ? –  rossipedia Jun 28 '11 at 17:46
    
@Bryan: Wouldnt that just move to that line? I need that line to be read again for the next iteration.. –  techmanc Jun 28 '11 at 17:56
    
techmanc it sounds like an easy problem to solve if you give an outline. Now it require a lot of guessing and assuming. Show what you have tried so far. –  Henk Holterman Jun 28 '11 at 18:11
    
Simplest method is to use : Read all lines and check for i+1... worked for me.. :) Thanks everyone –  techmanc Jun 28 '11 at 19:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Simply use

 string[] lines = File.ReadAllLines(filename);

and process the file with a for (int i = 0; i < lines.Length; i ++) loop.

For a big file, simply cache the 'previous line' or do an out-of-band ReadLine().

share|improve this answer
    
How do u do an out of band readline?? –  techmanc Jun 28 '11 at 17:59

Here is an idiom to process the current line you while having the next line already available:

public void ProcessFile(string filename)
{
    string line = null;
    string nextLine = null;
    using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(filename))
    {
        line = reader.ReadLine();
        nextLine = reader.ReadLine();
        while (line != null)
        {
            // Process line (possibly using nextLine).

            line = nextLine;
            nextLine = reader.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

This is basically a queue with a maximum of two items in it, or "one line read-ahead".

Edit: Simplified.

share|improve this answer

Can you not just call reader.ReadLine() again? Or is the problem that you then need to use the line in the next iteration of the loop?

If it's a reasonably small file, have you considered reading the whole file using File.ReadAllLines()? That would probably make it simpler, although obviously a little less clean in other ways, and more memory-hungry for large files.

EDIT: Here's some code as an alternative:

using (TextReader reader = File.OpenText(filename))
{
    string line = null; // Need to read to start with

    while (true)
    {
        if (line == null)
        {
            line = reader.ReadLine();
            // Check for end of file...
            if (line == null)
            {
                break;
            }
        }
        if (line.Contains("Magic category"))
        {
            string lastLine = line;
            line = reader.ReadLine(); // Won't read again next iteration
        }
        else
        {
            // Process line as normal...
            line = null; // Need to read again next time
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I need the line for the next iteration. I just need it as a reference to classify the current line.. Is there any way where I can open the line isolated from the current readline... I thought about reading all lines.. but there are cases where the file is enormous... and it wouldnt be ideal ! –  techmanc Jun 28 '11 at 17:58
    
@techmanc: How big is "enormous" exactly? You could always keep a copy of the line you read - the tricky bit is making sure you use that instead of reading the next line. –  Jon Skeet Jun 28 '11 at 18:12
    
I read 100 files and put them into a DB for one iteration. And some files are some 50-100 MB possibly! –  techmanc Jun 28 '11 at 18:27
    
@techmanc: Well that's not so much really - if it makes the code simpler, I'd be tempted to read each file in completely to process it. I'll give some code as an alternative though... –  Jon Skeet Jun 28 '11 at 18:31

You could save the position of the stream then after calling ReadLine, seek back to that position. However this is pretty inefficient.

I would store the result of ReadLine into a "buffer", and when possible use that buffer as a source. When it is empty, use ReadLine.

share|improve this answer

I am not really a file IO expert... but why not do something like this:

Before you start reading lines declare two variables.

string currentLine = string.Empty
string previousLine = string.Empty

Then while you are reading...

previousLine = currentLine;
currentLine = reader.ReadLine();
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