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I have a program which executes sql statements. Within a transaction, I'd like to update several tables using the same sysdate. eg. (run the following 3 statements in a transaction)

update table1 set some_col = 'updated' where some_other_col < sysdate;
delete from table2 where some_col < sysdate;
insert into table3 (col1, col2) select c1, c2 from table4 where some_col < sysdate;

If these 3 statements are executed in a transaction, the "sysdate" each one is using will be whatever timestamp we are at currently as this statement is running, not at the start of the transaction.

I could create a stored procedure and initially select the sysdate into a variable, using PL/SQL, but I'd prefer to just run sql statements from an external program.

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I think you answered your own question. Each query would have a slightly different datetime for sysdate the wa you are doing it above. I think you will need to make that stored proc. –  Limey Jun 28 '11 at 18:24
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I could create a stored procedure and initially select the sysdate into a variable, using PL/SQL, but I'd prefer to just run sql statements from an external program

Use an anonymous block instead of a stored procedure, something like (untested):

declare
  v_sysdate date := sysdate;
begin
  update table1 set some_col = 'updated' where some_other_col < v_sysdate;
  delete from table2 where some_col < v_sysdate;
  insert into table3 (col1, col2) select c1, c2 from table4 where some_col < v_sysdate;
  commit;
exception
  when others then 
  rollback;
  raise;
end;
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You can run/execute this just like regular sql (ie. from an external program)? –  Gerrat Jun 28 '11 at 18:35
    
...I don't believe there's any difference between this and a stored procedure - other than it's not stored...it's still PL/SQL, not SQL, and can't be run (directly) by an external program –  Gerrat Jun 28 '11 at 18:44
    
there are plenty of differences between a stored procedure and an anonymous block. What "external program" cannot run this directly (but can run individual DML statements)? –  tbone Jun 28 '11 at 18:49
    
Wow! Much to my surprise this worked! I never realized you could execute PL/SQL this way! This opens up a whole new world! Thanks bunches! –  Gerrat Jun 28 '11 at 18:56
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I'm afraid it's working as it's supposed to, the time is recalculated with each query. Just store the timestamp in a variable in your program, and use that variable in your queries.

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Which external program? If you are using SQL*Plus, this would work:

var d char(50)
begin select sysdate into :d from dual; end;
/

update table1 set some_col = 'updated' where some_other_col < :d;
delete from table2 where some_col < :d;
insert into table3 (col1, col2) select c1, c2 from table4 where some_col < :d;

You might have to adjust your NLS_DATE_FORMAT setting for the session...

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